Feeds

Cassini sniffs Enceladus's 'surprising organic brew'

Saturnian moon spews building blocks of life

SANS - Survey on application security programs

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has sampled a "surprising organic brew" erupting from Saturnian moon Enceladus's south polar region comprising "volatile gases, water vapour, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide, as well as organic materials".

Cassini performed an "in your face" flypast of the Moon on 12 March, skimming at over 51,000km/h (32,000mph) to within 50km (30 miles) of the surface. During the encounter, it skirted the "geysers" spewing what scientists suspected was water vapour and other material at an altitude of 200km (120 miles) for a quick "sniff and taste" of their composition.

The results have come as quite a surprise, as Hunter Waite, principal investigator for the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer at the Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, explained: "A completely unexpected surprise is that the chemistry of Enceladus, what's coming out from inside, resembles that of a comet. To have primordial material coming out from inside a Saturn moon raises many questions on the formation of the Saturn system.

"Enceladus is by no means a comet. Comets have tails and orbit the Sun, and Enceladus' activity is powered by internal heat while comet activity is powered by sunlight. Enceladus' brew is like carbonated water with an essence of natural gas."

Proof of Enceladus's internal heating was provided by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer, which captured an image of the "tiger stripe" fissures which are the source of the geysers - indicated by the yellow stars:

Composite Infrared Spectrometer image of Enceladus's south polar region. Pic: NASA

NASA explains that the fissures are "warm along almost their entire lengths", elaborating: "These more precise new measurements reveal temperatures of at least -93°C (-135°F). That is 17°C (63°F) warmer than previously seen and 93°C (200°F) warmer than other regions of the moon. The warmest regions along the tiger stripes correspond to two of the jet locations seen in [previous] Cassini images."

John Spencer, Cassini scientist on the Composite Infrared Spectrometer team at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, enthused: "These spectacular new data will really help us understand what powers the geysers. The surprisingly high temperatures make it more likely that there's liquid water not far below the surface."

Dennis Matson, Cassini project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, concluded: "Enceladus has got warmth, water, and organic chemicals, some of the essential building blocks needed for life. We have quite a recipe for life on our hands, but we have yet to find the final ingredient, liquid water, but Enceladus is only whetting our appetites for more."

Cassini is scheduled to make three further flybys of Enceldaus this year - the next in August - and while the spacecraft's prime mission to probe Saturn and its environs ends in June, the agency has hinted at "a proposed extended mission would include seven more Enceladus flybys". ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Most Americans doubt Big Bang, not too sure about evolution, climate change – survey
Science no match for religion, politics, business interests
KILLER SPONGES menacing California coastline
Surfers are safe, crustaceans less so
Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years
Alloy, Alloy: Boffins in speed-classification breakthrough
LOHAN and the amazing technicolor spaceplane
Our Vulture 2 livery is wrapped, and it's les noix du mutt
Liftoff! SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts Dragon on third resupply mission to ISS
SpaceX snaps smartly into one-second launch window
STEALTHY NANOROBOTS dress up as viruses, prepare to sneak into YOUR BODY
Cloaking techniques nicked from viruses tackle roadblocks on way to medical frontier
Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run
Helium seeps from Falcon 9 first stage, delays new legs for NASA robonaut
prev story

Whitepapers

Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.