Feeds

Byron review calls for computer game ratings

Which games ARE mad, bad and dangerous to play?

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

The Byron Review will today call for cinema-style age ratings for computer games to protect children from violent or sexual content.

Telly pyschologist Tanya Byron proposes a legally binding system of age ratings for games as well as better protection for children using the internet. She wants improved security and privacy practises from social networking sites like Facebook and Bebo.

Byron will recommend the U, PG, 12, 15, 18 cinema labels be adopted alongside elements of the Pan European Game Information (PEGI) system - the voluntary code followed by many game manufacturers. PEGI uses age recommendations as well as specific warnings for violence, fear, bad language, drug references, sexual content, or gambling. She will call for £5,000 fines or six months in prison for retailers who sell games illegally.

Byron will also call for games consoles to include parental controls to prevent children playing games not designed for their age group.

She says computers should be kept in shared spaces like the living room rather than in bedrooms so parents can more easily monitor what kids are doing online.

According to some reports, Byron will also ask for better controls of internet advertising - there have been concerns that advertisers prevented from using mainstream media to punt their products, like junk food, are using the internet to reach kids.

She is also expected to recommend an awareness campaign to advise parents on how to keep tabs on what their children are doing online. She has written a version of her report to be read by children.

The full report will be available from here. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Britain's housing crisis: What are we going to do about it?
Rent control: Better than bombs at destroying housing
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Top beak: UK privacy law may be reconsidered because of social media
Rise of Twitter etc creates 'enormous challenges'
Ex US cybersecurity czar guilty in child sex abuse website case
Health and Human Services IT security chief headed online to share vile images
Uber, Lyft and cutting corners: The true face of the Sharing Economy
Casual labour and tired ideas = not really web-tastic
The police are WRONG: Watching YouTube videos is NOT illegal
And our man Corfield is pretty bloody cross about it
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up Big Data
Solving backup challenges and “protect everything from everywhere,” as we move into the era of big data management and the adoption of BYOD.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?