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Samsung shifts 22-vibrate-mode handset

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Samsung has taken touchscreen vibration feedback technology, dubbed Haptic Touch, one step further, by unveiling a phone with no less than 22 different types of vibration.

Samsung_Anycall_Haptic

Samsung's AnyCall Haptic SCH-W420 has 22 vibration styles

The AnyCall Haptic SCH-W420 gives off different kinds of vibration according to the user’s actions. For example, the volume knob in the phone’s radio application clicks with each individual turn, much like an old-fashioned physical radio dial. However, typing out text messages means the phone vibrates to a different beat.

Whether or not users’ fingers will really be able to distinguish between so many different forms of vibration is another matter.

The W420 also has a 3.2in screen that’s able to display images snapped on the phone’s two-megapixel camera, or TV captured by the built-in digital tuner.

You won’t be able to test out the phone’s full range of vibration capabilities just yet, because the W420 is only set to be released in South Korea next month, for around 800,000KRW (£410/€520/$820).

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