Feeds

Rambus wins big in monopoly ding-dong

But must still overturn FTC ruling

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Rambus won big in the courtroom today, with a jury deciding the company had properly obtained patents for technology later incorporated into fast memory chip standards. So it's not a cheating monopoly after all, as memory chip makers Hynix, Micron and Nanya had sought to establish in US District Court in San Jose, California.

The ruling could be a nice money earner for Rambus, which says the verdict should enable it to collect $133.6m in damages it won against Hynix in a jury trial in April 2006. Rambus also stands to collect from the memory chip makers, but obstacles remain in its way.

In a valedictory statement Rambus general counsel Tom Lavelle said the ruling should "put to rest a series of ongoing allegations Rambus has endured for many years. Our business is to license our revolutionary technology to the industry for fair compensation. We are pleased to have this decision behind us as we continue to engage with the industry to deliver compelling products to the market."

Not so fast, Tom. Micron already plans to appeal. "Micron believes that Rambus has engaged in a pattern of deception, destruction of evidence, false testimony and other improper activities designed to mislead and to extract unjust patent licensing fees and damages. We will continue to vigorously advance our claims that Rambus has engaged in a variety of illegal activities designed to injure Micron,” said Rod Lewis, Micron’s top lawyer.

And then there is the small matter of the 2006 Federal Trade Commission ruling that Rambus illegally engaged in monopolistic behaviour through patent ambush of JEDEC (Joint Electron Device Engineering Council), the memory standard-setting body. Rambus is appealing that one and hopes for a verdict this summer.

And what about the European Commission? Last year, it entered the fray through a "statement of objection", accusing Rambus of patent ambush too. The Commission has been quiet on the matter since then, which could be ominous. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Official: European members prefer to fondle Apple iPads
Only 7 of 50 parliamentarians plump for Samsung Galaxy S
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.