Feeds

Laptop vendors burned in battery plant blaze

HP, Dell and Asus struggle to plug supply hole

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Some of the world’s leading computer vendors have admitted that a worldwide shortage of laptop batteries will impact prices, shipments and sales.

Dell, Hewlett-Packard and Asustek have all grumbled about the dent in the supply chain caused, in part, by a fire at a Korean factory earlier this month where some laptop batteries are manufactured.

Taiwanese computer maker Asus said yesterday that the battery scarcity could blow a massive 40 per cent hole in its second quarter shipments. The firm’s vice president Kevin Lin raised the alarm at a news conference.

He told Reuters: "The shortage could affect 30-40 per cent of second quarter shipments, but it looks like a short-term issue.”

Meanwhile Dell has been talking to other battery suppliers in the hope of preventing prices being jacked up because of the current shortage.

However, it also admitted that it has raised prices on its separately sold batteries used for replacements or for additional notebook power because of the lack of batteries in the market right now.

A Dell spokesman said: "Pricing is being impacted by current availability. But we are working with our partners throughout our supply chain to reduce the impact on our customers.”

HP was slightly more reticent about the shortage, but did tell Reuters that it is in “regular communication” with LG Chem – the battery maker whose Ochang plant went up in flames on 3 March.

A HP spokesman said in a statement: "The full extent of the impact to HP and other OEMs is still being determined.

"We are aggressively working within the battery cell industry to secure additional supply of battery cells."

LG Chem, which is South Korea’s second biggest battery vendor, said its factory will be out of action for up to three months. ®

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

More from The Register

next story
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
Jaguar Sportbrake: The chicken tikka masala of van-sized posh cars
Indian-owned Jag's latest offering curries favour with us
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
Here's your chance to buy an ancient, working APPLE ONE
Warning: Likely to cost a lot even for a Mac
Xiaomi boss snaps back at Jony Ive's iPhone rival 'theft' swipe
I'll have a handset delivered. Judge us after you try us...
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.