Feeds

Cuba, India vote no on OOXML

Aligning up against Microsoft

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Cuba and India are the latest countries to vote against Microsoft’s Office Open XML (OOXML) file format being adopted by the International Standards Organisation (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC).

Meanwhile Germany and the US confirmed that they won't be backing down on their call for the format to be ISO/IEC-approved.

The decisions from national delegates from 33 countries who took part in the DIS29500 ballot resolution meeting in Geneva in late February have been trickling in ahead of this Saturday’s crucial deadline.

Late last week India overwhelmingly rejected OOXML. Of the nineteen companies in the country submitting a vote, which included ODF supporters IBM, Sun Microsystems and Red Hat, only five came out in favour of adopting it as an ISO standard, according to the Economic Times.

Meanwhile, Cuba said it won’t be backing Microsoft’s file format this time around.

Representatives of the Cuban National Bureau of Standards have also claimed, according to an email seen by Groklaw, that Cuba had in fact voted against OOXML in September, suggesting that their votes had been miscounted in the original Geneva ballot. This claim hasn't been verified elsewhere.

Microsoft, which previously failed to secure enough votes in September last year, has been hoping to push OOXML through as an international standard with its second attempt.

Delegates who voted in the original fast-track ballot have been given until 29 March to change their position on the Office 2007 format should they wish to do so.

If enough of the 87 national member bodies reconsider their original vote then the format could proceed to publication alongside Open Document Format (ODF), which gained ISO approval last year.

But if Microsoft fails to secure enough votes this time around the standardisation proposal will be thrown out and the fast-track procedure will be axed. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?