Feeds

Verizon makes nice with P2P

We can help ISPs turn internet into big TV set

Application security programs and practises

From an ISP’s point of view, P2P traffic can appear to be exceptionally daunting. If they choose to block it, as some have accused almost all of the major US ISPs of doing, then their networks would become ghost networks, with virtually no traffic in sight. But if they embrace it, their networks are fast moving crazy places, where suppliers have to sprint to keep their network surviving.

So what’s it to be? Well Verizon appears, at least to be considering a middle road, one where instead of working against P2P, or just putting up with its traffic costs, it will offer protocols to help co-operate with P2P networks to deliver entertainment, by better understanding the conditions of the network it is traveling over. That really IS open.

The initiative began last July and is through the auspices of a Distributed Computing Industry Association (DCIA) working group called P4P, which stands for Proactive network Provider Participation for P2P. The two founder members and chairs come from Pando Networks and Verizon Communications. Pando is one of the new breed of P2P companies trying to eek out a living in legal P2P file delivery.

This is really a club for ISPs and P2P suppliers in which they can work out their differences and it is so much more of a positive approach than whining about network traffic and investing purely in “traffic shaping".

Statements from this workgroup claim that software that is already being tested which can improve download speed between 200 per cent and 600 per cent, purely by offering up a set of network APIs, which let a P2P application know which parts of a network are busy, and using this to intelligently decide which P2P nodes should be uploading in support of a file or stream delivery. It’s not rocket science, and if a CompSci grad student had been given the problem he could have come up with the same answer, but it is how to phrase that question which is interesting.

If the question was “How do we get traffic zingin around the internet, for nothing, without the help of the ISP and despite its best efforts to stop us,” then that definitively is the wrong question. If it were simply told “you have a network and multiple copies of large files distributed around that network, how do you build a rapid file delivery mechanism,” then naturally you reach the DCIA answer.

It is the history of ISPs and P2P suppliers being at each other’s throats for so long, that makes it hard to see how this might ever have come about.

In fact what needed to happen was that the livelihood of ISPs needed to be threatened, where the average customer was expecting more and more from the ISP, while the average monthly price for ISP service went down and down, and traffic on their networks went up and up, forcing more and more investment. At that point, P2P traffic is taken as a fact of life, not something that the ISP looks to the US Supreme Court to make illegal.

ISPs cannot block all P2P activity because Verisign’s Kontiki P2P client, which is now used to deliver millions of hours of TV services around the world from respectable broadcasters, Skype, as well as Joost and Babelgum, are not breaking any laws. Even Kazaa and Bit- Torrent may now be carrying more legal than illegal traffic, or if not yet, they should lean that way over time.

If we look beyond this simple set of proposals we see more and more which might be done. By bringing ISPs and P2P suppliers closer, perhaps the handshakes for this type of co-operative routing might also include some form of legitimate traffic audit. So we perhaps reach a point where if P2P traffic from your software passes some kind of “threshold” test of mostly sending legitimate files (something that deep packet inspection might still be needed for) then the APIs to sense the condition of the network are open to your client software, and it is pushed higher up the food chain in terms of the priority attached to the traffic.

If mostly copyrighted material appears to be traveling across the network, then perhaps that API co-operation is refused by the network nodes and the resulting traffic packets will be treated as low priority. That would create an underclass and upperclass of P2P clients, each with a signature which would trigger the various treatments by ISPs.

Eight steps to building an HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
SHOCK and AWS: The fall of Amazon's deflationary cloud
Just as Jeff Bezos did to books and CDs, Amazon's rivals are now doing to it
Amazon Reveals One Weird Trick: A Loss On Almost $20bn In Sales
Investors really hate it: Share price plunge as growth SLOWS in key AWS division
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
The triumph of VVOL: Everyone's jumping into bed with VMware
'Bandwagon'? Yes, we're on it and so what, say big dogs
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.