Feeds

Arthur C. Clarke dead at 90

The Final Odyssey

SANS - Survey on application security programs

Arthur C. Clarke has died at the age of 90.

The famed writer and visionary died early Wednesday morning at a hospital near his home in Sri Lanka, The Times reports.

Most famous for expanding his short story "The Sentinel" into a novel and screenplay that served as the basis for Stanley's Kubrick's 1968 film 2001: A Space Odyssey, the British-born Clarke authored more than 100 books involving space, science, and science fiction, and he's often credited with inventing the concept of satellite communications. He first proposed the idea in 1945 with a paper called "Extra-terrestrial Relays."

Today, the International Astronomical Union refers to a geostationary satellite orbit as The Clarke Orbit.

Having fought post-polio syndrome since the 1960s - a condition that forced him into a wheelchair at times - Clarke checked into the hospital four days ago, and according to his personal secretary, he died after experiencing a cardio-respiratory attack. He had lived in Sri Lanka since 1956.

Clarke was born in Minehead, Somerset, England on December 16, 1917. In 1936, he moved to London, where he worked as a clerk in Her Majesty's Exchequer and Audit Department and joined The British Interplanetary Society. He soon was contributing to the Society Bulletin, while trying his hand at science fiction.

During the Second World War, he joined the RAF and was eventually put in charge of a new radar-based blind landing system. Then, in May 1946, his first published story, "The Rescue Party," appeared in Astounding Science Fiction. "The Sentinel" was published two years later.

Kubrick approached Clarke in 1964, and after four years of collaboration, they received a joint Academy awards nomination for their work on the 2001 screenplay.

Clarke's "2001" novel, written alongside the screenplay, was followed by three sequels: "2010," "2061," and "3001: The Final Odyssey." Other well-known Clarke books include "Childhood's End," "The City and The Stars," "The Nine Billion Names of God," "Rendezvous with Rama," "Imperial Earth," and "The Songs of Distant Earth." ®

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Fancy joining Reg hack on quid-a-day challenge?
Recruiting now for charity starvation diet
Red-faced LOHAN team 'fesses up in blown SPEARS fuse fiasco
Standing in the corner, big pointy 'D' hats
KILLER SPONGES menacing California coastline
Surfers are safe, crustaceans less so
LOHAN's Punch and Judy show relaunches Thursday
Weather looking good for second pop at test flights
Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years
Alloy, Alloy: Boffins in speed-classification breakthrough
Curiosity finds not-very-Australian-shaped rock on Mars
File under 'messianic pastries' and move on, people
Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run
Helium seeps from Falcon 9 first stage, delays new legs for NASA robonaut
Top Secret US payload launched into space successfully
Clandestine NRO spacecraft sets off on its unknown mission
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.