Feeds

Apple US retail sales leap past PC par

MacBook Air driving demand?

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

Apple took 14 per cent of the US retail computer market last month - 25 per cent if you look at its share in terms of sales revenue - figures from market watcher NPD reveal.

This time last year, NPD's numbers show Apple's unit and revenue retail shares were nine per cent and 14 per cent, respectively. Apple shifted 55 per cent more desktops between February 2007 and February 2008, netting itself 68 per cent higher revenues. For notebooks, the growth rates were 64 per cent for units, 67 per cent for revenue.

Apple MacBook Air

Apple's MacBook Air: slim shape, big sales?

The US retail PC market as a whole grew nine per cent in the same period - five per cent in terms of sales revenue - though laptop unit sales were up 20 per cent, according to NPD's stats. Desktop shipments were down five per cent. Sales revenues for the two types rose by 11 per cent and declined two per cent, respectively.

So whatever you think of Apple's kit, mainstream buyers are clearly increasingly keen to try it out.

According to another analyst, Pacific Crest Securities' Andy Hargreaves, cited by AppleInsider, the MacBook Air was particularly popular in February, the month it went on sale. The Air attracted a raft of new buyers to the Apple platform, he said, not simply folk replacing an Apple laptop they already owned.

And not just consumers, either. While the Air might seem to appeal most directly to the kind of folk you see using laptops in Starbucks, Hargreaves claimed "a new set of corporate customers make up a meaningful portion of MacBook Air buyers".

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
Disturbance in the force lets phones detect gestures with Wi-Fi
These are the movement detection devices you're looking for
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
How to determine if cloud backup is right for your servers
Two key factors, technical feasibility and TCO economics, that backup and IT operations managers should consider when assessing cloud backup.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?