Feeds

Supermarket loses 4.2 million credit card details

Supermarket identity sweep

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

A New England-based supermarket chain has warned of an information security breach that exposed an estimated 4.2 million credit card records.

Hannaford said hackers might have accessed customer credit and debit card numbers - but not the corresponding names or addresses - after hacking into systems involving card authorisation. Details on exactly how the breach happened are unclear, but the problem is reckoned to have extended from 7 December until its discovery earlier this month.

"The stolen data was limited to credit and debit card numbers and expiration dates, and was illegally accessed from our computer systems during transmission of card authorisation," Hannaford chief exec Ron Hodge said in an open letter to customers posted on the grocer's website.

The intrusion affected all 165 Hannaford stores, 106 Sweetbay stores in Florida, and some independently-owned retailers in New England that use Hannaford's payment systems.

Hannaford apologised for the snafu and offered to help field customer concerns through its information centre at 866-591-4580. It urged customers to keep a close eye on their credit card bills in case any unauthorised transactions appear.

The supermarket chain told the Boston Globe that the breach potentially exposed 4.2 million credit and debit card numbers. About 1,800 cases of fraud have being linked to the breach, the paper adds. The US Secret Service is investigating the attack.

Hannaford Bros is based in Maine, USA, but owned by Belgium's Delhaize Group.

The Hannaford's breach is extensive, but small potatoes compared to the estimated 45.7 million accounts compromised over a period of two years as a result of a customer data breach at retailer TJX, which runs T.J. Maxx and Marshalls retail chains. A badly secured wireless network at one of TJX's stores was blamed for the breach, the worst example in an increasing long list of customer data security breaches to date. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
14 antivirus apps found to have security problems
Vendors just don't care, says researcher, after finding basic boo-boos in security software
Only '3% of web servers in top corps' fully fixed after Heartbleed snafu
Just slapping a patched OpenSSL on a machine ain't going to cut it, we're told
'Things' on the Internet-of-things have 25 vulnerabilities apiece
Leaking sprinklers, overheated thermostats and picked locks all online
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Israel's Iron Dome missile tech stolen by Chinese hackers
Corporate raiders Comment Crew fingered for attacks
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.