Feeds

Other languages key to Java's future

Platform play nice with others

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

QCon 2008 It is not the Java language that's important - it is the platform that has grown around it.

That's according to one veteran of architecture, design and distributed systems development now in the thick of training developers, who reckons the continued success of Java depends on its ability to adapt to modern development demands.

Venkat Subramaniam, the chairman of software training company Agile Developer, told QCon Java has grown beyond a language and the excitement is now centered on the combination of the Java platform with dynamic languages such as Groovy, JRuby and Jython.

"Multi-language environments mean you can get full interoperability between constructs created in different languages. Dynamic languages also give you the power of metaprogramming and domain-specific languages. This improves productivity and allows users to be more expressive," Subramaniam said

He added the combination of Java with other languages provides flexibility in development. "You can use techniques such as rule specification and let programs evolve to take dynamic decisions based on certain inputs or an application's state. You can also exploit the idiomatic differences of individual languages."

Subramaniam gave conference delegates several code demonstrations to illustrate how simple it is to combine Java code with a dynamic language. These included JavaScript and Groovy with language calls working in both directions.

"You can use Java JSR-223 as a standard interface for interoperability and use ScriptEngineManager to call in the script from the dynamic language. You can pick and choose between an invocable and a compilable interface - it depends on the circumstances and on which language you are using," Subramaniam said.

Subramaniam noted the compilable interface offered by Groovy made it simple to combine Java and Groovy code and use only a single pass to produce executable code. "Groovy 1.5 or later makes it easy - you just put in the J option and you can compile Groovy code into Java Bytecode. The Groovy compiler can compile both together in one go."

Sun Microsystems was quick to support Groovy when it was approved under the Java Community Process. Recently it has looked to expand the Java platform to support other dynamic languages such as Python and Ruby

The Register is a media sponsor of QCon London 2008.

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
You stupid BRICK! PCs running Avast AV can't handle Windows fixes
Fix issued, fingers pointed, forums in flames
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
prev story

Whitepapers

Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?