Feeds

Patricia Hewitt joins BT as non-exec director

MP and telecom sitting in a tree

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

Patricia Hewitt is to join BT later this month as a non-executive director, boosting her salary by a healthy £60,000.

The appointment of the former Secretary of State for both Trade and Health into one of Britain's largest private companies muddies the water between politics and business.

As a politician, Hewitt was closely involved with BT, although their relationship was not always cordial.

The Leicester West MP was instrumental in the creation of Ofcom, the all-in-one regulator for telecoms and the media, while she was head of the DTI. Not only did she help establish the Ofcom constitution, but she also appointed its chairman Lord Currie.

Ofcom took a far tougher approach to BT than its predecessor, Oftel. The regulator was quick to insist that BT must structurally separate its local loop division from the rest of the company; a brave move which left governments and regulators around the rest of the world watching with interest.

Hewitt was also responsible for relieving BT of nearly £5bn for its 3G licence at the height of the dotcom boom. It gave that licence up just one year later as it spun off its mobile activities, which became O2.

The Aussie-born 59-year-old was also closely involved with BT while she was Health Secretary.

During her tenure, BT won several contracts for the troubled NHS National Programme for IT, a multi-billion pound technology project for which the costs have spiralled.

Among its contract wins, BT won the right to build the national data spine, work which is much delayed and has been subjected to wide-ranging security concerns from privacy campaigners.

Major appointments of politicians into the business world are overseen by a parliamentary group, the Advisory Committee on Business Appointments, which have approved Hewitt's move. She has, however, been asked not to lobby government until June - 12 months after she quit as Health Minister.

Hewitt already holds positions at two private companies: Boots, the high street chemist chain, and private equity company Cinven, which also has interests in the health sector through its ownership of BUPA's UK hospitals.

Through her additional three roles, she is guaranteed to remain firmly in the public spotlight as both a politician and a businesswoman. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.