Feeds

Twittercide results in banality bloodbath

Witness: 'Ideas helpless against short attention spans'

Intelligent flash storage arrays

eComm Earlier this week, the Twitter sickness made a mockery of one tech conference. And now it's made a mockery of another.

Today, at eComm2008 in Mountain View, the communications elite couldn't stop talking about Twitter - otherwise known as Web 2.0rhea.

Those who couldn't stop talking about Twitter included Twitter lead architect, Blaine Cook, who reminds us of Susan Dey in her Partridge Family heyday.

"Blaine Cook is awesome," said conference MC Lee Dryburgh. "He invented Twitter."

"Actually, I didn't invent Twitter," said Blaine Cook. "Jack Dorsey, our CEO, invented Twitter."

Naturally, Blaine Cook's Twitter presentation was diced into 140-character sound bytes - just like Twitter.

And in the end, these sound bytes added up to something close to nothing - just like Twitter - or Larry Lessig - take your pick.

"You and me and everyone we know. This is what Twitter is about," Blaine Cook said. "It's also what the Internet is about."

"The Internet is a simple system."

"The web is a simple system."

"Email is a simple system."

"Simple systems are awesome."

"Twitter is a simple system."

"Did you become rich when Twitter was sold?" Dryburgh asked Cook.

"It hasn't been sold," Cook replied.

But Cook's Twitter-like Twitter talk wasn't as Twitter-like as the Twitter-like talk delivered by another Twitter lover: Jabber's Peter Saint-Andre.

His Web2.0rhea came out faster than Cook's Web2.0rhea.

But not as fast as he would have liked.

"I would have done it faster, but I have the stomach flu," he said.

But Lee Dryburgh didn't let the Digg generation down. He gave the entire conference Web2.0rhea.

At eComm, each and every speech is less than 15 minutes. Some less than ten.

There's even a countdown clock at the back of the room.

And if you keep spewing when the clock runs out, you get booted from the stage.

Think the Academy Awards.

What we don't understand is the poll Lee Dryburgh took just before Blaine Cook's speech.

He asked the audience how many people had heard of Twitter, and dozens raised their hands.

Then he asked how many were addicted.

How many?

Five or six.

Maybe less. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.