Feeds

Sun and Microsoft confirm data center lovechild

Mankind now writing emails to Redmond

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Er, will someone please get Scott McNealy on the horn? This Sun Microsystems and Microsoft love-in is getting ridiculous.

Sun Chairman McNealy used to hit us with the "It's Mankind versus Microsoft" shots as the two companies squabbled over anti-trust issues, run-times and, well, the nature of innovation. These barbs against Microsoft went so far as to include McNealy saying, "I can't leave my kids to Microsoft."

Microsoft has been less offensive to McNealy and Sun ever since it forked over about $2bn to settle disputes, agreed to an interoperability pact and helped chuck Windows on Sun servers. Now the companies plan to expand their mutual admiration society via an Interoperability Center.

Sun will send a bunch of servers and storage boxes up to the Redmond-based center. Engineers from both companies will work on testing Microsoft's server software with the gear. We're told that such work could lead to breakthroughs in 64-bit database technology and amazing e-mail servers.

"One of the first results of the recently increased collaboration is the availability of the Sun Infrastructure Solution for Microsoft Exchange Server 2007," the companies said. "This solution will help enable enterprise customers to better manage e-mail growth and realize the benefits of Exchange Server 2007. Pre-tested end-to-date system and storage configurations allow customers to easily migrate to Exchange Server 2007 - achieving up to 85 percent savings in rack space, power and cooling, and reducing total cost of ownership (TCO) for e-mail by up to 70 percent over three years."

There will be virtualization, Java and thin client work taking place as well.

Of course, we spotted Sun servers sitting in Microsoft data centers way back in 2005 - a love that barely dared speak its name. Apparently the Microsoft Enterprise Engineering Center wasn't a good enough home for Sun's hardware, prompting the creation of a super special lab.

Perhaps we'll one day see a member of the McNealy clan working in the center. ®

Build a business case: developing custom apps

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft: Azure isn't ready for biz-critical apps … yet
Microsoft will move its own IT to the cloud to avoid $200m server bill
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
Silicon Valley jolted by magnitude 6.1 quake – its biggest in 25 years
Did the earth move for you at VMworld – oh, OK. It just did. A lot
VMware's high-wire balancing act: EVO might drag us ALL down
Get it right, EMC, or there'll be STORAGE CIVIL WAR. Mark my words
Forrester says it's time to give up on physical storage arrays
The physical/virtual storage tipping point may just have arrived
VMware vaporises vCHS hybrid cloud service
AnD yEt mOre cRazy cAps to dEal wIth
prev story

Whitepapers

A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Maximize storage efficiency across the enterprise
The HP StoreOnce backup solution offers highly flexible, centrally managed, and highly efficient data protection for any enterprise.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.