Feeds
80%

Route 66 Mini Regional

Bargain

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Review If good things do indeed come in small - and cheap - packages then Route 66 should be on to a winner with its pocket-sized Mini satnav.

At the same time 'small' could equally mean the screen is illegible, while 'cheap' could mean that when you ask it to take you to Dorking it takes you to Skegness instead.

With external dimensions of 95 x 81 x 19.5mm, a weight of 149g and a price pegged at under £100, the Mini is one of the smallest, lightest and cheapest standalone satnavs on the market.

Route 66 Mini regional sat-nav

Route 66 Mini: complex junctions can be hard to fathom

Out of the box, the unit is well made and not bad looking in its silver and black livery. The solid and easy-to-use on/off switch also belies the Mini's price.

The bundled screen clamp isn't the most advanced in the world and the flexible arm needs a fair amount of effort before it actually bends. We thought it was rigid until we gave it good tug, but once set to the desired angle it works well enough and attaching/detaching the main unit is easy enough.

While bright and clear, the screen is only 3.5in in size, so using the touch keypad can be a little hit and miss. The Mini's menu structure is straightforward, but the best way to use it is often to detach it from the cradle and do your typing with it in hand - not good for on-the-move adjustments, though.

The maps, based on those developed by Route 66 for the Nokia 6110 Navigator, can best be described as functional. While they give a perfectly clear and legible picture of most road layouts, complex multi-level junctions can sometimes be just a little hard to fathom. The road you are on shows up in one colour while any upcoming changes of route show up in another - a simple but effective aid to navigation.

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
Who wants to be there as history is made at the launch of our LOHAN space project?
Two places available in the chase plane above the desert
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.