Feeds

Microsoft's LAMP answer arrives in pieces

Don't mention the Apache trip

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Last summer, Microsoft said that February 27, 2008 would be the single biggest day of releases in its 30-year history, promising major updates to its server operating system, developer tools and database.

After some fancy work fine-tuning PHP, MySQL and other open source code to Windows, Microsoft should have been ready to spark the interest of developers Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP (LAMP) and actually tempt them back to the Windows platform. But the company seems intent on both improving the lot of developers working with parts of LAMP and Windows and prying them away from LAMP wherever possible.

As February 27 dawned, and the mighty - from Go Daddy to Verizon - dutifully gathered to deliver well-scripted endorsements, it became clear that the only big dog barking at this launch was the PR. Microsoft hosted a glitzy global launch introduced by NBC grey hair news anchor Tom Brokaw, complete with streaming video using Microsoft's Silverlight to demonstrate the fledgling, cross-browser plug.

Spin over, we got the facts: retail availability of Visual Studio 2008, which has been available to MSDN subscribers since November, and an incomplete version of the successor to Windows Server 2003 R2: Windows Sever 2008, shipping with a beta version of its Hyper-V virtualization software. Hyper-V is expected in the next few months.

The update to Microsoft's popular SQL Server 2005 database - SQL Server 2008 - was present in name only, with availability postponed until at least the third quarter of 2008. This is just the latest delay to afflict Microsoft's database.

Invariably, when scrambling for something to announce, companies will dust off the benchmarks. On this particular occasion, Microsoft targeted server rivals IBM and Red Hat to claim superior performance.

Microsoft claimed that Windows Server 2008 with .NET Framework 3.5, underpinning Visual Studio 2008, delivers faster throughput than IBM's WebSphere running on Red Hat Linux, according to benchmarks from IBM and Sun Microsystems. Microsoft claimed 117 per cent and 94 per cent improved throughput, respectively, running a sample application.

Microsoft's faltering attempt to counter LAMP came, ironically, as it emerged that the company is courting another component in the open source acronym stack. Members of Apache visited the Microsoft campus with a view to improving Tomcat's support for Internet Information Services (IIS). Previously, Microsoft has entertained MySQL and Zend and worked with Novell.®

Remote control for virtualized desktops

More from The Register

next story
Be real, Apple: In-app goodie grab games AREN'T FREE – EU
Cupertino stands down after Euro legal threats
Download alert: Nearly ALL top 100 Android, iOS paid apps hacked
Attack of the Clones? Yeah, but much, much scarier – report
Microsoft: Your Linux Docker containers are now OURS to command
New tool lets admins wrangle Linux apps from Windows
Bada-Bing! Mozilla flips Firefox to YAHOO! for search
Microsoft system will be the default for browser in US until 2020
Facebook, working on Facebook at Work, works on Facebook. At Work
You don't want your cat or drunk pics at the office
Soz, web devs: Google snatches its Wallet off the table
Killing off web service in 3 months... but app-happy bonkers are fine
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.