Feeds

iPhone SDK won't be here in February after all

Luckily you never needed it anyway

Seven Steps to Software Security

The venerable S. Jobs said it would be out in February, having declared it unnecessary - now it seems the Software Developer Kit will be even later to the party. Business Week - who were right about the SDK itself last time - report a delay of another couple of weeks, though rumours suggest an alpha-test version might be launched so that Apple can deny the slippage.

When the iPhone was launched Jobs made great play of the fact that native applications weren't needed - everything could be done within the browser. But users want applications which are integrated with the rest of the phone's functions, and don't need to be downloaded every time the users wants them.

Currently only web-based applications are officially sanctioned on the iPhone and iPod Touch, and while many users have unlocked their devices to run applications developed using an SDK hacked-together by fans, that's not a sustainable model. No one is paying for those applications, which are being developed for fun and to prove it possible.

Various games companies already have access to some form of official SDK, and have been developing titles that are expected to be launched alongside the SDK. Even IBM has been working with Apple, to create a Lotus Notes client for its handset which should also be finished in time for the SDK launch.

It has been suggested that access to the official SDK could be limited to Apple partners, but that would risk alienating the highly-active iPhone developer community which has already sprung up despite the lack of official route to market - a community Apple would prefer to see refocusing their efforts using the official tools. Many companies are developing (and in some cases demonstrating) applications they would like to launch as soon as an official mechanism for doing so exists.

While the security model on the iPhone has been improved with various firmware updates, it seems likely that native applications will have little granulation in their security model - it's set to be an all-or-nothing approach. This gives Apple an excuse for demanding iTunes as the exclusive route to market, with every application signed by them and maintaining their relationship with the customers, while bypassing the network operator yet again. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Apple orders huge MOUNTAIN of 80 MILLION 'Air' iPhone 6s
Bigger, harder trouser bulges foretold for fanbois
GoTenna: How does this 'magic' work?
An ideal product if you believe the Earth is flat
Telstra to KILL 2G network by end of 2016
GSM now stands for Grave-Seeking-Mobile network
Seeking LTE expert to insert small cells into BT customers' places
Is this the first step to a FON-a-like 4G network?
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
BlackBerry: Toss the server, mate... BES is in the CLOUD now
BlackBerry Enterprise Services takes aim at SMEs - but there's a catch
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.