Feeds

Infra-red cameras to tackle congestion in Leeds

Face two face

Security for virtualized datacentres

Trials of technology to enforce use of a high occupancy vehicle route into Leeds will start next month.

Leeds City Council has agreed to trials of the latest version of technology which will automatically count the number of people travelling in cars on a high occupancy vehicle lane into the city centre. The trials are expected to start in March.

The new infra-red camera system combines optical technology with a bespoke image recognition system which can distinguish human faces.

It was developed by Laser Optical Engineering, a spin out company from Loughborough University. Funding for the project has come from the Department for Transport and Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.

"We have developed a unique mathematical formula for instant image recognition to enable an automatic and accurate count of faces in a moving car for the very first time," said Professor John Tyrer, director of Laser Optical Engineering. "We can even apply a size filter to the camera to make sure a hand held up where a passenger's face should be is not counted."

Cars travelling on the Leeds high occupancy vehicle lane, the first of its type in the UK, are permitted two or more occupants.

A spokesperson for Leeds City Council told GC News that the scheme, on a 1.5km stretch of the A647, has resulted in a 13 minute drop in journey times. The council is planning another similar scheme on Round Hay Road, a key route into Leeds.

Lone motorists who flout the rule face a £30 fixed penalty. However, the system currently relies on manual enforcement.

Professor Tyrer said manual enforcement does not work because it is costly and is only 55 to 65 per cent accurate. "There is especially a problem when vehicles are travelling at speed. So at the moment there is no alternative to using technology for enforcement of high occupancy vehicle lanes."

The Leeds spokesperson said: "We are keen that this trial takes place as soon as possible. Now we have to have people out there to monitor the lane, or the police can spot people. But if this new automated technology works it will allow us to enforce the system properly."

Preliminary versions of the system have been trialled on roads in Leeds and around the university, as well as at Mallory Park race track in Leicestershire.

"We have used the race track where we can set up road conditions and test vehicles at varying speeds and with different levels of occupancy," said Professor Tyrer.

"Twenty per cent of the public uses 80 per cent of the road space, so if more people share their cars, there is a massive amplification in terms of tackling congestion and emissions."

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

Kablenet's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

More from The Register

next story
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Hey Brit taxpayers. You just spent £4m on Central London ‘innovation playground’
Catapult me a Mojito, I feel an Digital Innovation coming on
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
EU probes Google’s Android omerta again: Talk now, or else
Spill those Android secrets, or we’ll fine you
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.