Feeds

eBay boycott results in mixed feedback

A++++ protest! Highly recommended! Would boycott again!

The next step in data security

Today marks the end of a week-long boycott of eBay from a semi-organized group of "power sellers" who feel shortchanged over recent pricing changes.

eBay announced late last month it would charge auctioneers between 25 and 50 per cent less to list their items on the site — but then take a larger slice of fees when the item actually sells. The company indignantly insists the move will benefit its sellers overall, but many of those with a high sales rate on their auctions are unhappy. eBay is also killing the ability for sellers to submit negative feedback on their customers.

For the moment, the results of the protest are unclear and of course, disputed. Online auction trackers such as PowerSellersUnite and Medved indicate eBay's total auction listings dropped as much as 13 per cent over the week — but sellers claiming victory may be jumping the gun.

eBay's listing figures tend to fluctuate widely from week to week even at the best of times. The site's listing drop to just under 13 million auctions could be a result of the protest. Or it could also just be a return to normalcy. Just the week before on February 13, eBay ran a one-day discount listing promotion that pushed listings up to about 15.9 million listings from numbers hovering around just 12.5 million.

At one end of the argument, boycott organizers say their temporary exodus worked. Some are even pushing to extend their absence from eBay until March 9th to hit the company's pocketbooks harder.

Meanwhile, dean of eBay Education Jim Griffith told USA Today that the site's internal statistics showed the boycott "has had no impact" on the site's listings. Conveniently the company does not release those figures publicly.

eBay remains largely unmoved by the protest. The company said it will not consider postponing or changing the new list fee pricing despite the evident outrage. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Hey, Scots. Microsoft's Bing thinks you'll vote NO to independence
World's top Google-finding website calls it for the UK
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Apple CEO Tim Cook: TV is TERRIBLE and stuck in the 1970s
The iKing thinks telly is far too fiddly and ugly – basically, iTunes
Israeli spies rebel over mass-snooping on innocent Palestinians
'Disciplinary treatment will be sharp and clear' vow spy-chiefs
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
OECD lashes out at tax avoiding globocorps' location-flipping antics
You hear that, Amazon, Google, Microsoft et al?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.