Feeds

Restored Vulcan hits financial turbulence

More cash needed for flight test programme

Security for virtualized datacentres

The trust which last October successfully got Avro Vulcan XH558 back into the air following a £6.5m restoration is rattling its tin again amid fears it may not have the cash to make the aircraft ready for the 2008 airshow season.

The Vulcan to the Sky trust explains that its cash shortfall is due to "potential sponsors [who] have drawn in their purse strings and are not making available the expected funds".

Dr Robert Pleming, the trust's chief exec, elaborated: "We need to start the rest of the test flight programme with the return of good weather at the beginning of March, but we still have to have £150,000 in our hands before we can do that, plus confidence that we will go on raising at least £50,000 per month after that.

"Right now we look like we're going to be starved of funds at this critical moment for the Vulcan. Every week's delay to the restart from the end of February will push the first display appearance back by another week."

He added: "I'm afraid that if we don't fly again soon, the door will start to close on the future of the Vulcan in flight. We won't be able to carry out our role of 'Honouring the Past, Inspiring the Future', providing a once-seen, never-forgotten sight to a new generation of youngsters, stimulating interest in design and engineering, and telling people about an important period in our nation's history.

"With the public's help, the triumphant return of this much-loved aircraft this summer will become the not-to-be-missed spectacle of the season. But we sincerely hope that companies will also give serious consideration to taking up the sponsorship opportunity of the year."

While the Vulcan XH558 project has been funded by a £2.7m Heritage Lottery Fund grant and a cool £500,000 donation from Wolverhampton Wanderers owner Sir Jack Hayward, most of the cash has come from small contributions by members of the public and other fundraising initiatives. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Thought that last dinosaur was BIG? This one's bloody ENORMOUS
Weighed several adult elephants, contend boffins
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
City hidden beneath England's Stonehenge had HUMAN ABATTOIR. And a pub
Boozed-up ancients drank beer before tearing corpses apart
'Duck face' selfie in SPAAAACE: Rosetta's snap with bird comet
Probe prepares to make first landing on fast-moving rock
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.