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Data Domain makes de-dupe box for corporate boonies

Beams back remote office data to mothership

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Data Domain wants to give its de-duplication technology a comfier fit in the wiring closet with a shrunken system for remote offices.

The DD120 is a miniaturized edition of the Data Domain's current data de-dupe appliances, and is designed specifically to replicate data from a branch office to a company's data center HQ. Network traffic and storage are reduced via the box since it eliminates redundant data.

The 1U DD120 provides 150GB/hour inline deduplication throughput. The physical storage capacity of the system is 750GB, which can hold between 7TB to 18TB of data with the wizardry of de-duplication, the company claims.

Although Data Domain already angles its DD510 and DD530 appliances at branch location backup, the new DD120 specifically comes bundled with a $2,000 license for Data Domain's Replicator software. That option in the latter two devices starts at an extra $3,500.

The DD120 is slower and has less storage capacity than its older siblings but comes in at a lower price. The new system starts at $12,500 compared to the next box up, the DD510, with a $19,000 starting price.

The 3U DD510 has a physical storage capacity of 3.75TB, and a logical, de-duped capacity of 135TB. Maximum throughput is 290GB/hour.

The DD120 supports CIFS or NFS protocols and the Symantec Veritas NetBackup OpenStorage interface.

The capacity liberating promises of de-duplication technology have sparked an arms race amongst storage vendors like Hitachi Data Systems, EMC, Network Appliance and Quantum. Last week, NetApp updated its OnTap operating system to allow de-dupe capabilities for primary data storage. NetApp takes the opposite side of the technology, using post-processing de-dupe, which removes redundant data after its written to disk. Data Domain does its voodoo before it's sent to backup.

The DD120 data sheet can be found here. (PDF warning) ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

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