Feeds
65%

Nokia 7900 Prism

Style over substance

The Power of One Infographic

Review Big brother to the Prism 7500, the somewhat sinister and Darth Vader-esque Prism 7900 is the next step in Nokia's campaign to convince us that visual style should be the primary driving force when it comes to buying a mobile phone.

But baroque and cyberpunk looks aside, it's the sparkling and still not-yet-commonplace OLED display that is the 7900's sole distinguishing technical feature.

You can find out what exactly OLED is here, but the short and tall of it is that an OLED screen makes for a bright and highly colourful display with far better contrast than a normal LCD while at the same time sucking down less power because it doesn't require a separate backlight. In the real world, all this means that it's hard not be just a little impressed when the 7900's 2in screen lights up.

Nokia 7900

Nokia's 7900: the screen's bright, but only when the weather isn't

The display is without doubt one of the brightest and clearest we've seen on a mobile phone. But sad to say it only really works when you're indoors or in poor light. In direct sunlight, the 7900's screen suffers badly, far more so than a traditional LCD screen, making it very difficult to read.

When active, the display changes depending on the time of day, battery strength and signal strength, a feature Nokia refers to with the rather disturbing phrase “living wallpaper”, which sounds like something you'd read about in a Clive Barker novel. You can also select from 49 keyboard backlight colours that radiate from below the keypad and pulse from the two horseshoe LEDs on the top of the handset giving potentially hours of fun setting up your phone to look just so and to match your personal aura down to a tee.

Nokia 7900

Fashionably thin

At 112 x 45 x 11.3mm and 101g, the 7900 is 3.5mm thinner and 18g heavier than the 7500. It comes with quad-band GSM/GPRS and 3G - though no HSDPA - and there's 1GB of on-board memory. Bizarrely, the 7900 lacks its sibling's memory expansion slot. Nor does it support 3G video calling - odd omissions for a phone with such fashion-tech pretensions.

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Child diagnosed as allergic to iPad
Apple's fondleslab is the tablet dermatitis sufferers won't want to take
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Seventh-gen SPARC silicon will accelerate Oracle databases
Uncle Larry's mutually-optimised stack to become clearer in August
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
The Essential Guide to IT Transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIO's automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise.
Mobile application security vulnerability report
The alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, and the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.