Feeds

Jane Fonda c-word slip shocks US

NBC apologises for Today outrage

Security for virtualized datacentres

Middle America is none to pleased with veteran thespiatrix Jane Fonda who yesterday entertained viewers of NBC's Today show with "a four-letter word for female genitalia".

Host Meredith Vieira had asked Fonda about her appearence in stage play The Vagina Monologues, which contains a section entitled "Cunt". In her answer, the actress referred to the segment by name, and the rest is history.

Vieira offered a swift on-screen apology, saying: "You know, before we go to break, in our last half-hour we were talking about The Vagina Monologues and Jane Fonda inadvertently said a word from the play that you don't say on television. It was a slip, and obviously she apologises, and so do we. We would do nothing to offend the audience, so please accept that apology."

According to Variety, a spokeswoman for the TV company later said the network was "letting Vieira's on-air apology to viewers serve as comment for the entire company".

The Parents Television Council, which describes itself as "the nation’s most influential advocacy organisation protecting children against sex, violence, and profanity in entertainment", was having none of it, and has "called on NBC to change its broadcasting practices" in response to the outrage.

It said in a statement: "There is no excuse for airing one of the most patently offensive words in the English language on broadcast television, especially at the breakfast hour. If an NBC employee used the 'c-word' to another employee, that employee would be suspended or even fired.

"While NBC's apology is helpful, it is not enough – millions of families were indeed offended. NBC must change its broadcasting practices and implement a time-delay on all of its live broadcasts, thereby ensuring that this type of language does not air on the publicly-owned airwaves."

The PTC further called on concerned citizens to "petition the FCC [Federal Communications Commission] in order to communicate clearly to NBC that this type of language is a violation of their broadcast licenses".

FCC action on the matter is, however, unlikely since "the agency's policy on live, fleeting expletives is under court challenge", as Variety explains.

As we reported last year, the FCC's 2004 ban on fleeting expletives took a bit of a legal shoeing when a New York court decided the body "may not have the right to police American airwaves".

Until 2004, the FCC's policy on passing profanity had been not to take action, but it decided to clamp down in a move described as "a reflection of President Bush's views".

It then weighed into Fox for two incidents, one involving singer Cher, the other Nicole Ritchie. In her acceptance speech at the 2002 Billboard Music Awards, Cher declared: "People have been telling me I'm on the way out every year, right? So fuck 'em."

Richie the following year entertained the crowd at the 2003 Billboard Music Awards with: "Have you ever tried to get cow shit out of a Prada purse? It's not so fucking simple."

Fox was found to be in breach of the revised indecency code, but was not sanctioned because the two incidents predated the revision. The company, backed by other broadcasters, challenged the ruling on the grounds that the FCC had "breached the US Constitution's first amendment, which guarantees the right to free speech".

The US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York agreed that the action was unconstitutional, and "questioned the basis" of the FCC policy overhaul. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Are you a fat boy? Get to university NOW, you PENNILESS SLACKER
Rotund types paid nearly 20% less than people who didn't eat all the pies
Emma Watson should SHUT UP, all this abuse is HER OWN FAULT
... said an anon coward who we really wish hadn't posted on our website
Japan develops robot CHEERLEADERS which RIDE on BALLS
'Will put smiles on faces worldwide', predicts corporate PR chief
Bruges Booze tubes to pump LOVELY BEER underneath city
Belgian booze pumped from underground
Let it go, Steve: Ballmer bans iPads from his LA Clippers b-ball team
Can you imagine the scene? 'Hey guys, it's your new owner – WTF is that on your desk?'
Amazon: Wish in one hand, Twit in the other – see which one fills first
#AmazonWishList A year's supply of Arran scotch, ta
SLOSH! Cops dethrone suspect - by tipping over portaloo with him inside
Talk about raising a stink and soiling your career
Ingredient found in TASTY BEER is GOOD for your BRAIN
You only have to drink 2k litres a day to see the effect...
Oz carrier Tiger Air takes terror alerts to new heights
Don't doodle, it might cost you your flight
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.