Feeds

Vodafone CEO finds wireless too complicated

Why can't things be more simple like when I were a lad?

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Mobile World Congress Vodafone CEO Arun Sarin today called for wireless unity, saying it's now so complicated it would be better if everyone just stopped using different operating systems and network technologies.

In his keynote, he pointed out that we're currently using between 30 and 40 different operating systems on mobile phones, and if customers could just decide which ones they want and not buy any of the others, things would be much easier. If that won't work, then perhaps the GSM Association could issue some recommendations.

He's also unhappy that 4G is fragmenting into two incompatible technologies - WiMAX and LTE (Long Term Evolution) - and says it would be better for everyone if the two standards were merged into one.

The WiMAX Forum responded that it'd love to see a single standard, and would let operators decide that WiMAX is the superior technology: pointing out that its standard is at least finished and being deployed, as opposed to the still-under-development LTE.

The forum paraded three of its deploying networks at the congress today, only two of which had funding from Intel – the UK's Freedom4 (formerly Pipex Wireless) and KDDI's unnamed Japanese deployment both listed Intel as a shareholder, Sprint being the other exhibit. Intel is a fierce proponent of WiMAX - as holder of significant patents on the technology it stands to gain through its popularity.

WiMAX is also pushing itself as the ideal technology to deploy at 700MHz, in case you know any countries where that spectrum might be available.

LTE, meanwhile, is not standing still, with an announcement today that Alcatel-Lucent and NEC are to work together to create LTE infrastructure solutions. This deal is also about getting Alcatel-Lucent into Japan (where NEC has NTT DoCoMo as a customer) and NEC into America (where Alcatel-Lucent has been trialling LTE with Verizon), but working together can only create greater interoperability and should speed the development of stable LTE equipment.

Vodafone's CEO stopped short of asking for regulation to restrict choices, but pointed out that developing for different platforms and networks was a waste of resources.

But by that logic we should all just accept the inevitable and cast our desktop Macs into the ocean, for the sake of platform simplicity. ®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE accused of silencing customer gripes on social media pages
Hello. HELLO. Can EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE HEAR ME?!
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
Shoot-em-up: Sony Online Entertainment hit by 'large scale DDoS attack'
Games disrupted as firm struggles to control network
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
Broadband slow and expensive? Blame Telstra says CloudFlare
Won't peer, will gouge for Internet transit
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?