Feeds

Seabed cables will be fixed by next week

But more will break - it's normal

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

The three - yes, just three - seabed telecoms cables which were broken in two (only two) recent incidents are expected to be fixed by next week, according to the operating companies. The ongoing tinfoil-hat frenzy that has followed the outages may take longer to die down.

Reuters reports that Indian telco cable subsidiary FLAG said yesterday that its line north of Egypt would be sorted by Sunday. The adjacent SEA-ME-WE 4 cable should be done tomorrow, according to its owner Videsh Sanchar Nigam Ltd. The third break, suffered by the FLAG-owned FALCON line between Dubai and Oman, should also be fixed over the weekend.

Seabed telecomms cable faults are actually a routine event, occuring twice a week according to industry experts. Most breaks result from human activities such as commercial fishing or ships' anchors dragging, but others are caused by storms. There are even a few cases (pdf, page 32) recorded of sharks biting through lines. The introduction of modern high-bandwidth fibre has meant that there is a tendency toward single points of failure, but in most cases alternative routes can be used and users never notice a problem.

The two breaks north of Cairo gained wide attention, however, as they initially caused severe disruption to traffic between Asia and Europe. The third break, followed by a power cut which briefly disabled a further Gulf line and an erroneous newpaper report claiming a fifth outage, saw tinfoil hats donned worldwide. The stampede gained such momentum that even respected analysts were caught up.

Fortunately the mainstream news services seem now to have stopped reporting breathlessly on every submarine outage. With luck, the conspiracy bloggers will soon wipe the spittle from their monitors and find something else to get excited about. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Sea-Me-We 5 construction starts
New sub cable to go live 2016
Vodafone to buy 140 Phones 4u stores from stricken retailer
887 jobs 'preserved' in the process, says administrator PwC
EE coughs to BROKEN data usage metrics BLUNDER that short-changes customers
Carrier apologises for 'inflated' measurements cockup
Comcast: Help, help, FCC. Netflix and pals are EXTORTIONISTS
The others guys are being mean so therefore ... monopoly all good, yeah?
Surprise: if you work from home you need the Internet
Buffer-rage sends Aussies out to experience road rage
EE buys 58 Phones 4u stores for £2.5m after picking over carcass
Operator says it will safeguard 359 jobs, plans lick of paint
MOST iPhone strokers SPURN iOS 8: iOS 7 'un-updatening' in 5...4...
Guess they don't like our battery-draining update?
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.