Feeds

Seabed cables will be fixed by next week

But more will break - it's normal

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The three - yes, just three - seabed telecoms cables which were broken in two (only two) recent incidents are expected to be fixed by next week, according to the operating companies. The ongoing tinfoil-hat frenzy that has followed the outages may take longer to die down.

Reuters reports that Indian telco cable subsidiary FLAG said yesterday that its line north of Egypt would be sorted by Sunday. The adjacent SEA-ME-WE 4 cable should be done tomorrow, according to its owner Videsh Sanchar Nigam Ltd. The third break, suffered by the FLAG-owned FALCON line between Dubai and Oman, should also be fixed over the weekend.

Seabed telecomms cable faults are actually a routine event, occuring twice a week according to industry experts. Most breaks result from human activities such as commercial fishing or ships' anchors dragging, but others are caused by storms. There are even a few cases (pdf, page 32) recorded of sharks biting through lines. The introduction of modern high-bandwidth fibre has meant that there is a tendency toward single points of failure, but in most cases alternative routes can be used and users never notice a problem.

The two breaks north of Cairo gained wide attention, however, as they initially caused severe disruption to traffic between Asia and Europe. The third break, followed by a power cut which briefly disabled a further Gulf line and an erroneous newpaper report claiming a fifth outage, saw tinfoil hats donned worldwide. The stampede gained such momentum that even respected analysts were caught up.

Fortunately the mainstream news services seem now to have stopped reporting breathlessly on every submarine outage. With luck, the conspiracy bloggers will soon wipe the spittle from their monitors and find something else to get excited about. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Driving business with continuous operational intelligence
Introducing an innovative approach offered by ExtraHop for producing continuous operational intelligence.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Protecting against web application threats using SSL
SSL encryption can protect server‐to‐server communications, client devices, cloud resources, and other endpoints in order to help prevent the risk of data loss and losing customer trust.