Feeds

Prince Opteron unloads on AMD, Intel and the future of memory

Fred Weber removes stealth shield

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Radio Reg Fred Weber had the look of a mad man.

There he was at some chip conference in 2002, waving sticks of memory around and talking about a new age of server computing. Weber, then CTO at AMD, planned to unleash 64-bits on the x86 realm. Intel claimed this was a horrible idea. Weber's, er, unwavering - sorry - enthusiasm told a different story.

AMD released Opteron a short-while after Weber's memory episode and proved the chip designer right. Server customers needed those 64-bits and access to loads of memory bad. You've met VMware, right?

In Episode 13 of Semi-Coherent Computing, Weber walks us through his early days as a physics student at Harvard, his time with DEC legend Gordon Bell and some slow going days at NextGen. Then we get to the good stuff with Weber's work on Athlon and Opteron chips for AMD, and many, many battles with Intel. Finally, Weber dishes a few tidbits of dirt on his new project - a start-up called MetaRAM that's set to de-stealth any day.

Okay, okay. So this interview runs a bit longer than usual at just over an hour.

Still, I think this puppy is worth the effort. And by "think," I mean "know."

Weber explains his central design philosophy which is, "If it can be done, you must do it." He also hits on where AMD excelled and why it has now fallen behind Intel.

Away from the x86 market, Weber confesses that he sees little future for discrete graphics, while adding that betting against Nvidia is like betting against Ethernet. Go figure that one out.

The future?

Yeah. We cover that too. It's all about memory, 3-D stacking and maybe even optical components - if a miracle occurs. Have a listen.

Semi-Coherent Computing - Episode 13

Open source types can get Ogged and Vorbed here, those plagued by low-bandwidth can catch a smaller, crappier quality show here and those of you with macho-sized bandwidth can get the big daddy here.

You can also grab the show off iTunes here or subscribe to the show via this feed.

Thanks for your ears. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
Don't wait for that big iPad, order a NEXUS 9 instead, industry little bird says
Google said to debut next big slab, Android L ahead of Apple event
Microsoft to enter the STRUGGLE of the HUMAN WRIST
It's not just a thumb war, it's total digit war
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Netscape Navigator - the browser that started it all - turns 20
It was 20 years ago today, Marc Andreeesen taught the band to play
A drone of one's own: Reg buyers' guide for UAV fanciers
Hardware: Check. Software: Huh? Licence: Licence...?
The Apple launch AS IT HAPPENED: Totally SERIOUS coverage, not for haters
Fandroids, Windows Phone fringe-oids – you wouldn't understand
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.