Feeds

Prince Opteron unloads on AMD, Intel and the future of memory

Fred Weber removes stealth shield

Business security measures using SSL

Radio Reg Fred Weber had the look of a mad man.

There he was at some chip conference in 2002, waving sticks of memory around and talking about a new age of server computing. Weber, then CTO at AMD, planned to unleash 64-bits on the x86 realm. Intel claimed this was a horrible idea. Weber's, er, unwavering - sorry - enthusiasm told a different story.

AMD released Opteron a short-while after Weber's memory episode and proved the chip designer right. Server customers needed those 64-bits and access to loads of memory bad. You've met VMware, right?

In Episode 13 of Semi-Coherent Computing, Weber walks us through his early days as a physics student at Harvard, his time with DEC legend Gordon Bell and some slow going days at NextGen. Then we get to the good stuff with Weber's work on Athlon and Opteron chips for AMD, and many, many battles with Intel. Finally, Weber dishes a few tidbits of dirt on his new project - a start-up called MetaRAM that's set to de-stealth any day.

Okay, okay. So this interview runs a bit longer than usual at just over an hour.

Still, I think this puppy is worth the effort. And by "think," I mean "know."

Weber explains his central design philosophy which is, "If it can be done, you must do it." He also hits on where AMD excelled and why it has now fallen behind Intel.

Away from the x86 market, Weber confesses that he sees little future for discrete graphics, while adding that betting against Nvidia is like betting against Ethernet. Go figure that one out.

The future?

Yeah. We cover that too. It's all about memory, 3-D stacking and maybe even optical components - if a miracle occurs. Have a listen.

Semi-Coherent Computing - Episode 13

Open source types can get Ogged and Vorbed here, those plagued by low-bandwidth can catch a smaller, crappier quality show here and those of you with macho-sized bandwidth can get the big daddy here.

You can also grab the show off iTunes here or subscribe to the show via this feed.

Thanks for your ears. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
Oi, Tim Cook. Apple Watch. I DARE you to tell me, IN PERSON, that it's secure
State attorney demands Apple CEO bows the knee to him
4K-ing excellent TV is on its way ... in its own sweet time, natch
For decades Hollywood actually binned its 4K files. Doh!
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
DARPA-backed jetpack prototype built to make soldiers run faster
4 Minute Mile project hatched to speed up tired troops
Hey, Mac fanbois. HGST wants you drooling over its HUGE desktop RACK
What vast digital media repository could possibly need 64 TERABYTES?
Apple Pay is a tidy payday for Apple with 0.15% cut, sources say
Cupertino slurps 15 cents from every $100 purchase
Apple's ONE LESS THING: the iPod Classic disappears
RIP 2001 – 2014. MP3 player beloved of millions. Killed by cloud
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
Protecting users from Firesheep and other Sidejacking attacks with SSL
Discussing the vulnerabilities inherent in Wi-Fi networks, and how using TLS/SSL for your entire site will assure security.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.