Feeds

Carbonite sprinkles some fancy over online backup service

Feature list set to 'Mozy'

Security for virtualized datacentres

It's a prudent time for fledgling online backup firm Carbonite to spit-shine its software now that EMC is serious about nurturing a rival, Mozy.

Carbonite has launched PCBackup version 3.5, which adds some extra backup and security options to its online service for Windows machines. For the most part, the upgrade is about catching up with EMC's Mozy, which was formally re-launched last month. And now that Carbonite's on more level ground with respect to features, it can lean on a price edge to try and attract individuals and SMBs.

Mozy offers small-fry businesses storage licenses at $3.95 per month, along with the option to purchase extra storage at 50 cents per GB per month. PCBackup goes for a flat rate of $49.95 per year (or about $4.15/month) for unlimited storage. Carbonite's flat rate plan is also shared by its main independent online storage rival, AllMyData.

A highlighted feature of the fresh software release is a wizard to help users migrate files from an older machine to a new system.

Another new tool is the ability to go back 90 days to restore a version of a file. The previous version of PCBackup could only revert to the most recent backup. To compare: Mozy has a similar feature, but it can only look backwards 30 days.

For security, PCBackup now allows users to keep their own encryption keys — an important piece for certain health care and legal firms. There's also a backup scheduler, which is pretty self-explanatory.

Block level incremental backup has been put into the mix for a speed boost in updating file changes. For instance, a single cell in an Excel spreadsheet can be backed up on its own, instead of re-sending the entire document.

Since we're on a roll of comparing the two products, we'll add that Mozy also does private encryption keys, backup scheduling and block level backups.

At this particular moment, it would seem the biggest difference is pricing, interface, and of course a preference in who you're willing to trust with your data. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Docker's app containers are coming to Windows Server, says Microsoft
MS chases app deployment speeds already enjoyed by Linux devs
IBM storage revenues sink: 'We are disappointed,' says CEO
Time to put the storage biz up for sale?
'Hmm, why CAN'T I run a water pipe through that rack of media servers?'
Leaving Las Vegas for Armenia kludging and Dubai dune bashing
Facebook slurps 'paste sites' for STOLEN passwords, sprinkles on hash and salt
Zuck's ad empire DOESN'T see details in plain text. Phew!
Windows 10: Forget Cloudobile, put Security and Privacy First
But - dammit - It would be insane to say 'don't collect, because NSA'
Symantec backs out of Backup Exec: Plans to can appliance in Jan
Will still provide support to existing customers
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why and how to choose the right cloud vendor
The benefits of cloud-based storage in your processes. Eliminate onsite, disk-based backup and archiving in favor of cloud-based data protection.
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.