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Sony shows off new shooters

Photographers have never had so much choice

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Sony has taken the wraps off a trio of new snappers, two DSLRs extend Sony's Alpha range: the 10.2 megapixel 300 and the 14.2 megapixel 350, plus the Cyber-shot DSC-H10 - an 8-megapixel high-zoom compact.

Both sport a 2.7in tilting LCD screen; anti-shake technology; nine-point autofocus; internal anti-dust mechanism; spot, centre-weighted and 40-segment metering; ISO 100-3200 sensitivity; and a fast live autofocus mechanism for shooting with the LCD as a viewfinder.

Sony Alpha 350 DSLR

Sony's Alpha 350

The 300 model can shoot three continuous frames per second when you use the viewfinder, but it can manage two frames per second using the LCD. The 350 can shoot 2.5 frames a second and two frames a second, respectively, with viewfinder and LCD.

Both SLRs have a slot for CompactFlash Type I/II media cards, but an adaptor for Memory Stick Duo cards is available separately.

The Alpha 350 and 300 will be available in the UK in March and April respectively. UK pricing has yet to be confirmed, but we suspect the A350 will cost around £500 of your hard-earned given in the US the camera body alone is costing $800, and the A350 kit with a DT 18-70mm f3.5-5.6 3.9x zoom lens is shipping for around $900. The A300 kit with a DT 18-70mm f3.5-5.6 standard zoom lens will ship in the US for about $800.

Sony Cyber-shot H10

Sony's Cyber-shot H10

The other device from Sony making its debut today is the high-zoom Cyber-shot DSC-H10. Designed to replace the current DSC-H3 model, the 8 megapixel H10 camera also sports a wider, 3in LCD screen than its predecessor.

Featuring a Carl Zeiss 10x optical zoom lens and a long-range flash, its face-detection technology can identify and focus on up to eight faces in a frame, Sony claimed.

The camera includes Sony's advanced sports shooting mode, which "combines high shutter speed and continuous auto-focusing to help you capture fast-action shots". Other features include shooting up to ISO 3200 and Super Steady Shot optical image stabilisation.

No UK pricing or availability details were announced, but it's going to ship in the States for around $300. It's expected to arrive in the UK the Spring.

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