Feeds

Gurus answer MapReduce young turks

Database blues and grays

3 Big data security analytics techniques

The two database gurus whose blog produced a storm of protest over their criticism of Google's MapReduce technology last month have hit back with a robust defense.

In their latest joint posting Michael Stonebraker and David DeWitt have respond to four specific issues raised by their critics: that MapReduce is not a database and, therefore, should not be judged as such, that MapReduce is scalable, that MapReduce is cheap, and - finally - that the two are merely "the old guard" defending traditional database management (DBMS) technology.

They claim that the original critique never said that MapReduce is a database - only that it is capable of performing some of the same tasks - specifically the analysis of large datasets. It is, therefore, legitimate to make the comparison between the two and conclude that "most things that are possible in MapReduce are also possible in a SQL engine".

On the scalability of MapReduce, Stonebraker and DeWitt note that the jury is still out on this and "as far as we are aware there are no published papers that study the scalability of MapReduce in a controlled scientific fashion". They also dismiss the claim that DBMS is expensive compared to MapReduce - pointing out open source alternatives to expensive commercial products.

Finally, they admit to being "gray beards" who "have seen a lot of ideas come and go" but add that gray beards and young turks should not be adversaries.

The initial response to Stonebraker and DeWitt's defense indicates that the argument looks set to continue. While a few commenters have reacted positively, the majority remain unconvinced.®

SANS - Survey on application security programs

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.