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Alcatel-Lucent confirms 400 job cuts in France

All part of the same cull

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Alcatel-Lucent said today that it plans to slash 400 jobs in France as part of its brutal cost-cutting strategy to axe 4,000 employees worldwide.

The announcement follows on from the networking group's run of dire quarterly results which has seen the firm lurch into the red.

Alcatel-Lucent said in a statement that it had extended its voluntary-based restructuring program which started in October last year, when the company admitted that jobs would be slashed in a cash-saving exercise to overhaul its carrier business.

The firm, which was formed by Alcatel's takeover of Lucent in 2006, said the extra cuts were necessary in response "to the realities of the telecom industry’s difficult environment".

It admitted that 400 French jobs were on the line, although it also stated there were no plans to close any of the firm's offices in France with plans to maintain R&D activities with investments to be made in 4G mobile phone techology.

In October last year the firm announced that the 4,000 headcount job cull would save about €400m by the end of 2009.

Alcatel-Lucent will release its fourth quarter and full-year results on 8 February. ®

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