Feeds

Wii not the way to lose weight

Step away from the pie

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

If you’re serious about getting fit then the Wii’s sports games will get you partly there, but they’re no substitute for traditional exercise, according to a group of Canadian students. Duh.

The 28-strong band of testers from Dalhousie University in the East Coast city of Halifax, Nova Scotia each played the console’s Wii Sports boxing game for 30 minutes. They also walked around a park and worked out to a boxing video for 30 minutes each, as a comparison exercise. Whoever said students were lazy..?

Each student’s heart rate was measured during the three activities and although the Wii game got players moving and off the couch, it failed to pass the mark as a cardiovascular exercise. Of all three tests, the students found that the boxing video was the best fat burner, followed by the Wii game. A walk in the park was the least energetic.

Perhaps a good session on the upcoming Wii Fit game, which has already sold 1m copies in Japan, will get your heart racing more though, because its central theme is exercise.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.