Feeds

Samsung unveils second-gen GX digital SLR

The GX-10 grows up

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Samsung has followed its GX-10 digital SLR (DSLR) with the GX-20, which is the first DSLR to feature an image sensor manufactured by the South Korean colossus.

GX-20_front_view

Samsung produced its own 14.6-megapixel CMOS sensor for the GX-20

The company claims that by producing its own sensors, its cameras benefit from reductions in size and pricing across the board. The GX-20 still comes with a £700 (€940/$1360) price tag though, but that does include an 18-55mm lens.

The GX-20 builds on the GX-10’s 10.2 million pixels to offer a 14.6-megapixel sensor. But it only replaces the GX-10’s 2.5in display with a slightly larger, wide-view 2.7in LCD. It also has an optical viewfinder.

Blurred images shouldn’t be a problem, because Samsung claimed that the GX-20’s able to physically shift its CCD to counter any movement of the camera’s body both horizontally and vertically. For example, if you get the shakes during a celeb photo shoot and the camera moves to the right, then its CCD will move to the left by the same degree. This, Samsung claimed, eliminates the need for anti-shake circuitry.

Likewise, if you’re shooting on a breezy, rainy hillside then you'll be glad to know that 72 potential access points for grime and dirt have been sealed off. It also has a top ISO sensitivity of 6400, which is significantly higher than the GX-10’s maximum sensitivity.

GX-20_side_view

An 18-55mm lens is thrown in

A one-touch RAW button’s built in, enabling you to view RAW format pictures on the display and convert them into JPEG through a built-in convertor. When shooting in RAW, you’ll be able to capture up to nine frames per second (f/s), but that drops to 3f/s when you opt for JPEG.

There’s barely a fag paper between the maximum image sizes each mode can capture, though. RAW mode will get you a 4688 x 3120 resolution shot, whilst JPEG mode produces 4672 x 3120 snaps.

The camera accepts SDHC memory cards of up to 4GB, the contents of which can be transferred to your PC via the built-in USB 2.0 port if you lack a suitable card reader.

You can get your mitts on the Samsung GX-20 from March.

For all this week's major photography launches check out Register Hardware's Cameras channel. Our camera reviews can be found here

Related Reviews
Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H3 'superzoom' camera

New hybrid storage solutions

More from The Register

next story
Half a BILLION in the making: Bungie's Destiny reviewed
It feels very familiar - but it's still good
Apple's big bang: iPhone 6, ANOTHER iPhone 6 Plus and WATCH OUT
Let's >sigh< see what Cupertino has been up to for the past year
Huawei ditches new Windows Phone mobe plans, blames poor sales
Giganto mobe firm slams door shut on Microsoft. OH DEAR
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Get your Indian Landfill Android One handsets - they're only SIXTY QUID
Cheap and deafening mobes for the subcontinental masses
Apple's SNEAKY plan: COPY ANDROID. Hello iPhone 6, Watch
Sizes, prices and all – but not for the wrist-o-puter
DARPA-backed jetpack prototype built to make soldiers run faster
4 Minute Mile project hatched to speed up tired troops
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.