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Seagate releases 250GB laptop HDD

Playing catch-up

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Seagate is now selling 250GB laptop-friendly hard drives, including a model with integrated automatic data encryption, the company announced this week.

The 250GB drive is part of Seagate's Momentus line. It spins at 5400rpm and connects to the host computer using a 3Gb/s SATA interface. They contain 8MB of cache.

Seagate Momentus 5400.4

Seagate's Momentus 5400.4: up to 250GB capacity

The 2.5in Momentus 5400.4 line-up also includes 120GB, 160GB and 200GB models. Like the 250GB version, these capacities are what the drive delivers before it's formatted.

Seagate touted the drives' shock resistance - they're able to take 325Gs and 900Gs of, respectively, operating and non-operating shock - and low power consumption: 2W during read and seek operations, 1.6W when writing, 0.6W when idling, and 0.2W in stand-by mode.

All fine and dandy, but Seagate's still behind the curve as rivals like Toshiba, Western Digital and Fujitsu are already touting 320GB notebook drives.

Hitachi, meanwhile, is promising to ship a 500GB 2.5in HDD in the very near future.

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