Feeds

'Highly critical' security bug bites HP Virtual Rooms

More ActiveX insecurity

Using blade systems to cut costs and sharpen efficiencies

A security researcher has uncovered a serious security bug in a Hewlett-Packard website used to host virtual meetings that could allow an attacker to remotely run malicious code on the machines of people who use the service.

The vulnerability in HP Virtual Rooms resides in the ActiveX client used to install the service on users' PCs, according to this advisory posted Tuesday on the Full-Disclosure mail list. Vulnerability tracking service Secunia rates it "highly critical," because it can be used by attackers to compromise a user's machine.

Over the past year, security slip-ups at HP have put its laptop customers at risk for at least three attacks. Two of them allowed attackers to remotely run malicious code if they could lure victims to a booby-trapped website. A third bug allowed miscreants to render the machine unbootable. The flaws, which HP has since fixed, resided in software that comes pre-installed on machines and is typically used to help users install updates and trouble shoot technical problems.

HP Virtual Rooms is a package of online tools for business collaboration, training and support. Participants can enter rooms to discuss particular projects and collaborate in real-time with colleagues on spreadsheets, video presentations and other jobs.

The bug in HP Virtual Rooms is found in hpvirtualrooms14.dll, which is used to install software needed to make the service work on an end-user's machine. It is likely used only during the installation process, so one possible work-around involves setting the killbit for the control.

The bug was reported by Elazar Broad. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Black Hat anti-Tor talk smashed by lawyers' wrecking ball
Unmasking hidden users is too hot for Carnegie-Mellon
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
Own a Cisco modem or wireless gateway? It might be owned by someone else, too
Remote code exec in HTTP server hands kit to bad guys
British data cops: We need greater powers and more money
You want data butt kicking, we need bigger boots - ICO
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.