Feeds

Viva VBA - alas

Entrenched victory

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

The biggest competitors to Office 2007 are really earlier versions of Office. The changes to the GUI combined with the lack of real user demand for change means that upgrades are slow in rolling out, but there is now a gentle drift.

As large corporates now go for standardized builds of Windows rolled out to thousands of users at a time, a few users who like the multi-threading capabilities of Excel 12, or the really cool components in the new Word, may simply be ignored.

Microsoft makes real money out of its users when they upgrade, not while they use the product, so anything that slows this process is not popular at all.

That means, that if Microsoft were to lose the plot and kill VBA, a huge wave of powerful users would flatly refuse to allow upgrades. As with credit derivatives, a large percentage of all the money made (or lost) by banks goes through VBA, aided and abetted by C++ XLLs.

The final reason VBA isn't going away comes from the irony of the Windows monoculture of many firms, that - because everyone has to use the same collection of software, configured much the same way - the corporate configuration has to be capable of running less mainstream applications that are important somewhere in the firm.

So, although most users of Office do not code VBA, and a large percentage don't even use VBA code written for them, enough use is made somewhere that they must have the facility. Think of VBA as like the ladies toilets in a firm where 99% of the staff is male.

A version of Office without VBA would therefore find it extremely hard to penetrate corporates and even quite a few smaller outfits, because it would find it difficult to co-exist with previous editions.

VBA will, I believe, be with us for a long time. You might not like it, very few people do, but the reality is VBA will be providing work for a lot of people in IT long after Windows Vista is a memory.®

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Why has the web gone to hell? Market chaos and HUMAN NATURE
Tim Berners-Lee isn't happy, but we should be
Microsoft boots 1,500 dodgy apps from the Windows Store
DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! DEVELOPERS! Naughty, misleading developers!
'Stop dissing Google or quit': OK, I quit, says Code Club co-founder
And now a message from our sponsors: 'STFU or else'
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.