Feeds

Germans send teen tearaway to Siberia

Boot camp cure for violent youth

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

The German authorities have packed off a violent 16-year-old youth to fend for himself in a remote Siberian village in the hope the "intensive educational experience" will cure him of his anti-social tendencies.

The unnamed lad, from the central state of Hesse, was given his marching orders after "behaving violently in school and at home and attacking his mother", the Guardian explains.

While in the "forlorn" hamlet of Sedelnikovo, a good few hours drive from Omsk, he's obliged to chop his own firewood, pump water from the well, and dig his own toilet.

Worse still, he's cut off from friends, family, TV, and the internet, although he does still attend school "under the supervision of a Russian-speaking German assistant".

Stefan Becker, the head of the youth and social department in Giessen, said: "We deliberately sought a region that was particularly lacking in allure. [He] spends most of his time trying to cope with his day to day existence, living in conditions like we had 30 or 40 years ago. If he doesn't chop the wood, his room is cold. If he doesn't fetch water, he can't wash."

The Germans are apparently in the habit in dispatching ne'er-do-wells to foreign lands*, including Greece and Kyrgyzstan, although while some support the boot camp approach to teen delinquency, others are unimpressed.

The Christian Democratic state president of Hesse, Roland Koch, backs boot camps and and favours "warning-shot" arrests for young offenders. The Guardian notes his election speeches have "particularly focused on clamping down on immigrants, said to be responsible for half of all crimes committed by the under-21s".

For others, though, the whole thing smacks more of "a reality TV show than a social welfare programme", as one commentator put it.

Cash, too, may be a factor. The Siberian exile apparently costs €150 a day - roughly a third of the cost of a locally-based punishment. ®

Bootnote

*Anyone who makes any comment whatsoever even lightly suggesting that the Germans have been sending large numbers of ne'er-do-wells to other people's countries for yonks wil be banned from reading El Reg for, let's say, 1,000 years.

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise
Not exactly attractive to the Israeli tourist demographic
Oz bank in comedy Heartbleed blog FAIL
Bank: 'We are now safely patched.' Customers: 'You were using OpenSSL?'
Happy 40th Playmobil: Reg looks back at small, rude world of our favourite tiny toys
Little men straddle LOHAN, attend tiny G20 Summit... ah, sweet memories...
Forget the beach 'n' boardwalk, check out the Santa Cruz STEVE JOBS FOUNTAIN
Reg reader snaps shot of touching tribute to Apple icon
Lego is the TOOL OF SATAN, thunders Polish priest
New minifigs like Monster Fighters are turning kids to the dark side
Dark SITH LORD 'Darth Vader' joins battle to rule, er, Ukraine
Only I can 'make an empire out of a republic' intones presidential candidate
Chinese company counters pollution by importing fresh air
Citizens line up for bags of that sweet, sweet mountain air
Google asks April Fools: Want a job? Be our 'Pokemon Master'
Mountain View is prankin' like it's 1999...
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.