Feeds

Jobs: Blu-ray wins HD format war then loses to downloads

Physical media out-evolved, apparently

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Blu-ray Disc beat HD DVD, but who cares? Downloads, not physical media, are the future of HD content consumption. So said Apple CEO Steve Jobs this week, a comment that's a distant echo of allegations made by Transformers director Michael Bay last year.

Bay grumbled that the HD format war was, in part, Microsoft's fault, the fight being stirred up to worry consumers into not buying eitehr format and give the software giant to put movie download and rental services in place. Which is, of course, just what Apple launched this week: HD-ready iTunes Movie Rentals.

You can hardly accuse Apple of doing what Bay accused Microsoft. The Mac maker may have joined the Blu-ray camp in March 2006, but it's done almost nothing to promote the format since then, not even offering high-end machines with optional integrated Blu-ray writers.

Did Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard add Blu-ray support, as was rumoured last year? If it does, Apple isn't saying – or whether it supports HD DVD too. Has anyone even tried it with these media to see? There doesn't seem much interest in finding out, which probably tells you all you need to know about computer-centric demand for both formats at the moment.

“Clearly, Blu-ray won, but in the new world order of instant online movie rentals, in HD, no one will care about what format is where,” said Jobs, precied by CNBC reporter Jim Goldman.

So will movie-oriented consumers reject Blu-ray Disc and HD DVD payers, and buy Apple TV boxes instead? They're more likely to now that Apple's offering rentals. But there will always be punters who like to maintain large libraries of discs, and for them boxes like Apple TV will never appeal.

Then there's the PS3 crowd. They may be games players first, movie watchers second, but hat's prove sufficient to have driven Blu-ray ahead of HD DVD in the early days, and now that the PS3 supports DivX, it too is geared up for Jobs' world of downloads.

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.