Feeds

FDA approves cloned animal products

Preliminary findings rule foodstuffs safe

A new approach to endpoint data protection

The US's Food and Drug Administration (FDA) yesterday declared foodstuffs derived from some cloned animals safe.

The FDA said: "After years of detailed study and analysis, the Food and Drug Administration has concluded that meat and milk from clones of cattle, swine, and goats, and the offspring of clones from any species traditionally consumed as food, are as safe to eat as food from conventionally bred animals. There was insufficient information for the agency to reach a conclusion on the safety of food from clones of other animal species, such as sheep."

While there are currently around 570 cloned animals in the US, the livestock industry has "so far followed a voluntary ban on marketing food from the animals", Reuters explains. Were it to embrace cloning, consumers wouldn't see derivative products for four to five years.

The FDA doesn't expect cloned animals "to enter the food supply in any significant number", since they'll be used for breeding. It elaborates: "Instead, their sexually reproduced offspring would be used for producing meat and milk for the marketplace."

Controversially, the FDA will not require "labelling or any other additional measures for food from cattle, swine, and goat clones, or their offspring because food derived from these sources is no different from food derived from conventionally bred animals".

Advocacy group Food and Water Watch warned in a statement: "Despite widespread public disapproval, FDA is not planning to require labelling of products from cloned animals, keeping already wary consumers in the dark."

Greg Jaffe, director of biotechnology at the Centre for Science in the Public Interest, reckons the cloning industry "must now convince the public why cloning is useful". He said: "Just because the technology is safe, it doesn't mean that as a society there is reason to embrace it."

The livestock industry seems to have acknowledged public wariness of cloned animal products, and Tyson Foods Inc, the US's largest meat producer, said yesterday "it has no immediate plans to buy cloned livestock". ®

The Essential Guide to IT Transformation

More from The Register

next story
Just TWO climate committee MPs contradict IPCC: The two with SCIENCE degrees
'Greenhouse effect is real, but as for the rest of it ...'
Asteroid's DINO KILLING SPREE just bad luck – boffins
Sauricide WASN'T inevitable, reckon scientists
Brit amateur payload set to complete full circle around PLANET EARTH
Ultralight solar radio tracker in glorious 25,000km almost-space odyssey
Boffins spot weirder quantum capers as neutrons take the high road, spin takes the low
Cheshire cat effect see neutrons and their properties walk different paths
NASA Mars rover FINALLY equals 1973 Soviet benchmark
Yet to surpass ancient Greek one, however
Famous 'Dish' radio telescope to be emptied in budget crisis: CSIRO
Radio astronomy suffering to protect Square Kilometre Array
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?