Feeds

Apple to charge $20 for iPod Touch update

But latest iPhone firmware will be free

Website security in corporate America

Macworld Expo Apple has sold more than 4m iPhones since the handset was launched in June 2007, CEO Steve Jobs said today - an average of 20,000 a day, he said. That was a prelude to the announcement of the phone's latest firmware - and one for the iPod Touch that comes at a price

Unfortunately, the Macworld keynote was short on up-to-date stats: Jobs would only point out that the iPhone garnered 19.5 per cent of the US smartphone market during the first three months it was on sale, a market share that placed Apple second only to RIM, which commanded 39 per cent of the market.

The firmware update announced by Jobs was the anticipated update that's been doing the rumour-mill rounds since just before Christmas. It'll support the ability to send text messages to multiple recipients, make the handset's home screen customisable and incorporate Google's Locate Me feature into the iPhone version of Google Maps.

It's not clear at this stage whether or not the anticipated addition of inter-application cut-and-paste facilities have been added. However, website bookmarks can now be saved on the home screen, each recalling how you last viewed the bookmarked site.

Up to nine of these webclips can be added, and the home screen's array of icons will now run to multiple pages to accommodate these and other applications.

The iPhone's iPod application will get the ability to support multiple soundtracks for different languages, along with subtitle tracks and DVD-style chapter marks - handy for the new iTunes Movie Rentals service. Songs will get lyrics.

The iPhone update will be free of charge, Jobs said, but the iPod Touch update will cost $20. It will bring the iPhone's Maps, Stocks, Notes and Weather apps to the big-screen music player. Not compelling? Maybe not, but the addition of the iPhone's Mail application will be for many Touch users. It's included in the $20 bundle.

The update will cost £13 in the UK.

Macworld Expo Stories
Apple NAS box ties in to Leopard's Time Machine
It was the MacBook Air sub-notebook
Apple looks to movie rentals to revive Apple TV box
Apple to charge $20 for iPod Touch update

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.