Feeds

ISPs nominate UK record industry as top internet villain

Put your handbags down ladies

Security for virtualized datacentres

The behind-the-scenes row between broadband providers and the record industry over filesharing has turned public, with internet trade association ISPA nominating the BPI for its "Villain of the Year" gong today.

BPI

BPI boss Geoff Taylor.

Caption suggestions in the comments please.

The ISPs are under pressure to make a voluntary deal with rights holders to disconnect persistent illegal filesharers. The government has threatened to introduce legislation in November if the pair can't agree.

It's obviously not going well, however. ISPA says the BPI makes this year's villain list "for its heavy handed approach against consumers rather than engaging in constructive dialogue with the internet industry when dealing with filesharing".

The BPI was unavailable to respond today. In December its chief executive Geoff taylor said: "The BPI has been seeking to persuade ISPs for more than a year that they should implement such procedures [disconnecting filesharers] but progress has been limited."

ISPA also named Conservative leader David Cameron as a villain of the last 12 months "for buddying up with the music industry and trying to appeal to a younger audience".

Cameron gave the keynote speech at the BPI AGM in July and promised to extend copyright term if record companies agree to "positive role models for young kids". More pursuant to his nomination, he also said ISPs should do more to help the BPI battle illegal filesharing.

Competitiveness minister Stephen Timms' nomination is notable in the "Hero of the Year category", "for leading the push to increase internet access speeds, paving the way for services such as high-definition internet TV". Timms' work has so far been limited to promising something called a "vision statement" on next generation broadband.

Winners will be announced on 14 March, and the full list of nominations is here, including a bizarre "Hero" nod for Facebook "for respecting peoples' browsing privacy". ®

Business security measures using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Driving with an Apple Watch could land you with a £100 FINE
Bad news for tech-addicted fanbois behind the wheel
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
Sony says year's losses will be FOUR TIMES DEEPER than thought
Losses of more than $2 BILLION loom over troubled Japanese corp
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.