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HP punts four new ProLiant servers at SMBs

Mixes-up mid-market merchandise

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Hewlett-Packard is pushing four new ProLiant servers destined for the wiring closets of mid-sized businesses. According to HP's Proliant marketing director John Gromala, the new systems will revamp the company's SMB gear with more compact systems and lower prices.

The new systems are listed below. We will divide the unit specs with rubber ducks. You could ask why we'd do such a thing — but then, you don't see us bothering you at work about trifling matters. Live and let live, we always say.

Two of the servers are available now. First up is the HP ProLiant DL185 G5: A two-processor server that needs 2U of rack space. This system runs on one or two Opteron 2200 processors from AMD. Hewlett-Packard says the server is best for mail and messaging, video capture and online gaming. It boasts 14 large form-factor, hot plug drives for 10.5TB of storage, dual networking interface cards (NICs), three PCI-Express slots and optional redundant power supplies. It starts at $1,750.

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The other system out now is the DL160 G5. It's a 1U server housing a pair of quad-core 5400 Xeon processors with support for the latest and greatest front side buses. The DL160 has up to 32GB of RAM and an internal storage capacity of up to 3TB using four 750GB hot-plug SATA drives (3.5-inch). It also sports two PCI-Express x16 2.0 slots. Pricing begins at $1,400. The system will replace the ProLiant DL150 in HP's mid-market lineup.

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HP's DL180 G5 will hit the market in February. The general-purpose box is a 2U, two-processor server using Intel quad-core chips. It has three PCI-E slots, 12 large form-factor hot plug drives for 9TB storage and optional redundant power supplies.

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The DL165 G5 is an Opteron-powered two-processor, 1U server. Gromala said it's the first rack-mounted server that features four 3.5-inch hard disk drives. It will be available in March, and replaces the ProLiant DL145.

Pricing for the DL165 and DL180 G5 has not been announced.

HP is also throwing in some upgrades to its Lights-Out 100 remote management software with the new gear. ProLiant ML110 G5, ML150 G5, ML310 G5 and DL320 G5p will get the updates too. The new features include virtual DVD-ROM support, allowing businesses to access DVD-ROMs remotely and virtual media USB 2.0 media support that improves performance of remote data transfer. ®

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

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