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BT Vision inks Disney-ABC deal

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BT Vision has signed a content deal with Disney-ABC Intl. Television which will see subscribers able to enjoy over 650 episodes of hits such as Lost and Desperate Housewives.

According to Variety, the roster of shows also includes Ugly Betty, Scrubs, Grey’s Anatomy and Ghost Whisperer, all of which can be had on a pay-per-view basis or as part of BT Vision's monthly packs.

BT Vision CEO Dan Marks said: “So many of these series... continue to catch the imagination of viewers and media alike and now all these series will be available to BT Vision customers whenever they want to see them."

The latest expansion of BT Vision's portfolio follows its recent announcement it would target the UK's Xbox 360 owners, offering on-demand TV and movies via their consoles.

The company is doubtless hoping its multiple initiatives will kickstart some proper demand for the service. Since launching in 2006 it has attracted around 100,000 customers, and looks unlikely to reach its target of "hundreds of thousands" by the end of March. ®

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