Feeds

Go native with iPhone development

Baby steps

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Hands on I'll admit it. I'm an unashamed fan of the iPhone. I had an unlocked device in the UK running on my cheapskate Vodafone tariff before November's official launch.

From a developer perspective my real interest is in being able to create native iPhone applications. I emphasize native. There's plenty of information around on how to build web-based applications, but I'm talking about native-code executables.

Apple is expected to release an iPhone SDK after this week's Macworld, San Francisco, California, but until then, we have to resort to experimentation that's not officially sanctioned by Apple and relying on knowledge you've gleaned from iPhone-related sites.

In lieu of the full SDK and an open environment, I've taken a look at the first steps you can take building and deploying a native iPhone application.

Under the hood

The Mac has two principal class libraries - Foundation and AppKit. Authored in Objective-C (for the most part) these provide the architectural bedrock on which Cocoa programming is done. On the iPhone, the counterpart libraries are called CoreFoundation and UIKit. There are, in fact, a whole slew of other frameworks present on both platforms. This includes the recently introduced LayerKit.framework, also known as Core Animation on Leopard. In fact the UIView class - the equivalent of NSView - has layer support built right into it.

Before you can start creating iPhone applications, you need an appropriate toolchain. If you're not familiar with the concept, suffice to say that a toolchain encompasses the compiler, linker, assembler, header files, and the static and shared libraries needed to build an executable for a particular platform. The unofficial iPhone toolchain is based around the GNU tools, and it's a certainty that whatever Apple come ups with, the same will be true there. This is because Apple's development tools already use the GNU stuff.

You can configure xCode for iPhone development but I decided against that. Instead, I used the Cygwin tools; a Linux-style environment, based around the GNU toolset, but running under Windows. This might seem an eclectic way of doing things, but there's method in my madness.

Business security measures using SSL

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
Bonking with Apple has POUNDED mobe operators' wallets
... into submission. Weve squeals, ditches payment plans
This flashlight app requires: Your contacts list, identity, access to your camera...
Who us, dodgy? Vast majority of mobile apps fail privacy test
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.