Feeds

Light reading for XML with Groovy

Intuitive, naturally

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Hands on, part 2 Groovy, unlike Java, provides a relatively streamlined way to read and write XML documents. In the first part of my two-piece tutorial, I looked at how you can use Groovy's flexible strings, closures and iterators to quickly create XML fragments and files.

The emphasis was on making the most of Groovy as a scripting language rather than on making use of the heavyweight XML parsers and libraries that it can access due to its use of the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) and ability to access Java libraries.

This time, I turn to the other side of the equation, and look at how you can use Groovy to quickly and simply process XML.

Groovy can be used with the full range of Java XML parsers and libraries - so in addition to vanilla DOM and SAX, you can use JDOM, XOM, StAX and the whole alphabet soup of alternatives that are available for the Java platform.

What we're interested in here, though, is using Groovy for the kind of ad-hoc scripting tasks that have traditionally been the preserve of languages such as Perl. Instead of the heavyweights we are going to focus on Groovy's XmlSlurper class, which provides a very natural and intuitive interface to XML.

Our example data is the following simple XML file:


<?xml version="1.0"?>
<people>
  <person first_name='john' surname='smith'>
    <age>37</age>
    <gender>m</gender>
    <kids count='2' />
  </person>
  <person first_name='jill' surname='jones'>
    <age>28</age>
    <gender>f</gender>
    <kids count='0' />
  </person>
  <person first_name='clark' surname='kent'>
    <age>22</age>
    <gender>m</gender>
    <kids count='3' />
  </person>  
</people>

The first task is to parse the file - which we've called pers.xml and have placed in a /groovy/progs directory - from disk and make it available for processing. In Groovy this is a one-liner:

def pers=new XmlSlurper().parse(new File("/groovy/progs/pers.xml"))

Once we've got our XmlSlurper object we can use dot notation to access elements and attributes within it. Using dot notation is a very natural way of working for Java developers, and helps to bridge the gap between object notation and hierarchic XML structure. The top-level element in this case is people, but we can find that simply enough:

        println pers.name()

The above code will print people to the command-line or shell. Want to find out what the child elements are? Easy:


pers.children().each { println it.name() }

But why stop there? We can move up and down the tree easily enough. Say we want to find the children of each of the child elements in turn. Again, it's trivial:

pers.children().children().each {println it.name()}

That should print out three lots of age, gender and kids. Getting hold of attributes isn't much more difficult:


pers.children().each {println it.attributes()}

The output of that line of code is:


["first_name":"john", "surname":"smith"]
["first_name":"jill", "surname":"jones"]
["first_name":"clark", "surname":"kent"]

Note that the above is a map, with the attribute names acting as the keys.

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
Google opens Inbox – email for people too stupid to use email
Print this article out and give it to someone techy if you get stuck
Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
Open-source 'love' fairly runneth over at cloud event
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.