Feeds

UK gov scraps '£1bn' prisoner tracking system

Strategic review orders strategic retreat

Intelligent flash storage arrays

David Hanson, minister of state at the Ministry of Justice, told the Commons yesterday that the over-budget project to link prison and probation IT systems is being canned.

C-NOMIS aimed to provide one system for tracking offenders whether they were in prison or out on probation. The National Offender Management Service (NOMIS) was to be provided by EDS for an initial cost of £39m and an estimated cost for the whole project of £234m. A review was announced in August because the project was running out of money. At that time, Unions put the likely cost of the project at about £950m. All development work stopped while the review was carried out.

The review recomends that the Prison Service gets a version of C-NOMIS but the project is not rolled out to include the Probation Service. Instead, the Probation Service will get an improved case management system and read-only access to some data held by Her Majesty's Prison Service. The government is still considering its options with regards to CRAMS - the case management most commonly used by the Probation Service.

Hanson told Parliament yesterday: "I have agreed these carefully costed measures on the recommendation of the governance boards of the National Offender Management Service and Ministry of Justice. We will continue to scrutinise the value for money provided by each business case as they develop."

EDS said in a statement:

We note the recommendations for the future direction of the NOMIS Programme outlined by the National Offender Management Service (NOMS) following the review commissioned by the Minister in August 2007. As per the recommendations outlined, EDS will continue to work closely with our client, NOMS, to rollout C-NOMIS across the public prison estate. C-NOMIS was successfully implemented within prisons on the Isle of White [sic] in December 2006, and is functioning well.

NAPO, the union of probation and court officers, said the news severely undermined government promises to deliver end-to-end management of offenders.

The scrapping of NOMIS is yet another broken link in a chain of tech-related screw-ups in the UK's justice process.

In December, the ministry of Justice announced it was to investigate how the court system updates the Police National Computer. An earlier review had shown that there was wide variation in how magistrates courts update the system.

Reports suggested thousands of criminals may have escaped justice when they failed to turn up for their court cases because warrants were never issued. As a result, they would not have been pursued by police, and the charges would not have shown up on the Police National Computer.®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Ex-US Navy fighter pilot MIT prof: Drones beat humans - I should know
'Missy' Cummings on UAVs, smartcars and dying from boredom
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express
Series finally hits stride, but Clara's U-turn is baffling
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.