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Toshiba remains upbeat about HD DVD

And launches Low-def models

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

CES Today’s Toshiba press conference at CES saw an unprecedented queue hundreds of metres long as hacks lined up to hear Toshiba's take on Warner Home Video's recent announcement to opt for the Blu-ray format. One UK reporter was even offered $50 for her press pass.

Inside, Jodi Sally, Marketing VP of the digital A/V Group, remained upbeat and positive as she addressed the issue of HD DVD business.

“As you can imagine this has been a tough morning. Obviously the events of the last few days have shifted my comments slightly," she said.

"But we still believe that HD DVD is the best format for consumers. Toshiba has delivered on its promised again and again. We‘ve been declared dead before... our unit sales for the fourth quarter were the best yet.”

And Toshiba today launched two back-to-basic DVD players, the SD-6100 and entry-level SD-4100.

Toshiba SD-6100 DVD player

Toshiba's SD-6100: bread and butter

The SD-6100 features upconversion to 720p, 1080i and 1080p resolution with HDMI connectivity, and support for discs containing DivX, WMA, MP3 and JPEG files. The entry-level SD-4100 DVD player features component video output and likewise offers JPEG and MP3 playback.

Toshiba SD-4100 DVD player

The SD-4100: entry level

Two DVD Recorders were announced. The D-R410 offers 1080p upconversion through HDMI, supports DVD±R/RW media, sports a DV input and both MP3 and JPEG playback. The step-up D-R560 adds to these features HD and SD TV tuners and WMA and DivX playback.

The new line up of products for 2008 includes the SD-P101S, SD-P91S and SD-P71S portable DVD players with 10.2in, 9in and 7in displays, respectively. All feature a four-in-one(SD, MMC, MS and xD) memory card slot; and support WMA, MP3 and JPEG playback. Toshiba said the top two models delive a battery life of five hours, while the entry-level SD-P71S runs for three hours.

Finally, two DVD Recorder/VCR combination models, the D-VR660 and D-VR610 multi-format DVD recorders offering 720p, 1080i and 1080p upconversion through HDMI, with HD and ST tuners, and support for DVD±R/RW recording and playback. The D-VR610 also includes line input to allow recording from cable boxes and satellite receivers.

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