Feeds

HD DVD bash knocked on the head

Gartner critical capabilities for enterprise endpoint backup

CES Here in Las Vegas ahead of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) the first casualty of Warner Home Video's decision to back Blu-ray is the HD DVD shindig scheduled for Sunday night. Clearly unwilling to face the press, the HD DVD camp have cancelled the event. Toshiba and co. are no longer in a party mood.

The HD DVD event is usually one of the most well-attended of the pre-CES dos, but presumably the industry figures who would have gathered to field the assembled hacks' questions don't want to face the inevitable demands to know how they can avoid becoming the loser in the next-gen optical disc format fight.

“We are currently discussing the potential impact of this announcement with the other HD DVD partner companies and evaluating next steps,” the HD DVD Promotional Group said in a statement mailed out to the planned event's registered attendees.

“We believe the consumer continues to benefit from HD DVD's commitment to quality and affordability – a bar that is critical for the mainstream success of any format.”

Don't write us off yet, in other words, but this isn't fighting talk. The HD DVD PG has been dealt a harsh blow, and it's still reeling. Surely this is the very time the organisation needs to show it's not cowed? Just saying it's going aay to think about things isn't going to inspire confidence in the format.

Pundits will now turn their attention to which studio(s) will change sides - a move that will almost certainly signal the beginning of the end of the format they leave behind.

Until then, consumers now have to opt for both formats if they want to be able to any given HD movie. Chances are, no individual's requirements are going to be served by a single format. That favours Samsung and LG, companies that have both launched players capable of handling both formats.

Unless, of course, buyers become even more determined to wait it out until there's a clear winner.

And then Apple may announce that it will, at long last, begin offering Blu-ray Disc drives in its desktop Macs, either as options or as standard. It's been in the Blu-ray camp since March 2006, but has yet to back the format as fully as fellow travellers like Dell and Sony have. Maybe now it will, encouraged by WHV's jump.

Now that would really make Blu-ray's month...

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Raspberry Pi B+: PHWOAR, get a load of those pins
More USB ports than your laptop? You'd better believe it...
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
Reg man looks through a Glass, darkly: Google's toy ploy or killer tech specs?
Tip: Put the shades on and you'll look less of a spanner
Apple promises to lift Curse of the Drained iPhone 5 Battery
Have you tried turning it off and...? Never mind, here's a replacement
Now that's FIRE WIRE: HP recalls 6 MILLION burn-risk laptop cables
Right in the middle of Burning Mains Man week
Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
Super Cali signs a kill-switch, campaigners say it's atrocious
Remote-death button bad news for crooks, protesters – and great news for hackers?
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?