Feeds

Linux squeezes into connected devices

But Android is nowhere to be seen

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

OpenMoko, the open source Linux platform designed for mobile phones, has found its way into a connected GPS device as well as a consumer-friendly mobile phone, showing what Google's Android could do if OpenMoko wasn't already doing it.

Realising that not everyone wants to compile their own kernel before making a call, OpenMoko has announced the Neo FreeRunner to be launched at the upcoming CES event, TMC Net reports.

The FreeRunner is much the same as the Neo 1973, though with a faster processor and some additional features. But it's what's missing that will attract many users.

The Neo 1973 was a developer's toy, with buyers encouraged to create their own OS image, and even muck about with the hardware to make the kind of phone they wanted. The FreeRunner won't come with the same range of developers tools, though the faster processor will no doubt attract many developers wanting to see what the OpenMoko platform can do.

OpenMoko is, in many ways, what Google's Android would like to be: a free operating system for mobile phones and connected devices, which allows users - be they handset producers or end customers - to make any changes they want to the OS.

And with cellular connectivity coming into more devices there is an expanding market for flexible, embedded, OSs. Dash Navigation's choice of OpenMoko for their Dash Express GPS navigation product makes sense, even though they've no interest in allowing end users to add or develop applications.

Which raises the question of how many open and free Linux-based operating systems the world of connected devices needs. Symbian has, so far, limited itself to mobile phone handsets - but that's set to change over the next few months - and unless Google can grab significant market share in the next year, Android will just be another impressive demonstration which went nowhere. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
Google opens Inbox – email for people too thick to handle email
Print this article out and give it to someone tech-y if you get stuck
Microsoft promises Windows 10 will mean two-factor auth for all
Sneak peek at security features Redmond's baking into new OS
UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open source
Entity Framework goes 'code first' as Microsoft pulls visual design tool
Visual Studio database diagramming's out the window
Google+ goes TITSUP. But WHO knew? How long? Anyone ... Hello ...
Wobbly Gmail, Contacts, Calendar on the other hand ...
DEATH by PowerPoint: Microsoft warns of 0-day attack hidden in slides
Might put out patch in update, might chuck it out sooner
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.