Feeds

Linux squeezes into connected devices

But Android is nowhere to be seen

New hybrid storage solutions

OpenMoko, the open source Linux platform designed for mobile phones, has found its way into a connected GPS device as well as a consumer-friendly mobile phone, showing what Google's Android could do if OpenMoko wasn't already doing it.

Realising that not everyone wants to compile their own kernel before making a call, OpenMoko has announced the Neo FreeRunner to be launched at the upcoming CES event, TMC Net reports.

The FreeRunner is much the same as the Neo 1973, though with a faster processor and some additional features. But it's what's missing that will attract many users.

The Neo 1973 was a developer's toy, with buyers encouraged to create their own OS image, and even muck about with the hardware to make the kind of phone they wanted. The FreeRunner won't come with the same range of developers tools, though the faster processor will no doubt attract many developers wanting to see what the OpenMoko platform can do.

OpenMoko is, in many ways, what Google's Android would like to be: a free operating system for mobile phones and connected devices, which allows users - be they handset producers or end customers - to make any changes they want to the OS.

And with cellular connectivity coming into more devices there is an expanding market for flexible, embedded, OSs. Dash Navigation's choice of OpenMoko for their Dash Express GPS navigation product makes sense, even though they've no interest in allowing end users to add or develop applications.

Which raises the question of how many open and free Linux-based operating systems the world of connected devices needs. Symbian has, so far, limited itself to mobile phone handsets - but that's set to change over the next few months - and unless Google can grab significant market share in the next year, Android will just be another impressive demonstration which went nowhere. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Not appy with your Chromebook? Well now it can run Android apps
Google offers beta of tricky OS-inside-OS tech
Greater dev access to iOS 8 will put us AT RISK from HACKERS
Knocking holes in Apple's walled garden could backfire, says securo-chap
NHS grows a NoSQL backbone and rips out its Oracle Spine
Open source? In the government? Ha ha! What, wait ...?
Google extends app refund window to two hours
You now have 120 minutes to finish that game instead of 15
Intel: Hey, enterprises, drop everything and DO HADOOP
Big Data analytics projected to run on more servers than any other app
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile
Data demand and the rise of virtualization is challenging IT teams to deliver storage performance, scalability and capacity that can keep up, while maximizing efficiency.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.