Feeds

Emacs diet for Visual Studio?

A whole .Net less

Boost IT visibility and business value

The grapevine is buzzing with the news Microsoft is looking for developers with knowledge of the Emacs Lisp-based editing tool. The big question is what Doug Purdy - Microsoft's group programme manager for Windows Communication Foundation (WCF) and web services guru - wants with a 30-year-old text editor that is generally confined to super-techies and how it will fit in with Microsoft's .NET.

It certainly has nothing to do with bringing Emacs to a Windows environment. There are existing versions of the Emacs editor for Windows including one from the GNU project and another from Lisp specialist Franz.

There is some cynical speculation that Microsoft is about to rip off the GPL-licensed Emacs code, re-package it as a proprietary product and sue Emacs users for patent infringement. But there is also a plausible suggestion that Microsoft is planning an Emacs-like editor as an alternative to Visual Studio's existing front end both to appease techies who are fed up with feature bloat and, at the same time, give .NET a leg up.

Given Purdy's position in Microsoft and his long-term support for cross-system interoperability, the latter is more likely. An extensible Emacs-like editor that can push .NET into new areas is a good move for Microsoft and could be good news for advanced developers. Microsoft has promised to reveal more in October, the month the company plans to host its Professional Developers' Conference (PDC) in Los Angeles, California.®

Application security programs and practises

More from The Register

next story
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Do YOU work at Microsoft? Um. Are you SURE about that?
Nokia and marketing types first to get the bullet, says report
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
Chrome browser has been DRAINING PC batteries for YEARS
Google is only now fixing ancient, energy-sapping bug
Big Blue Apple: IBM to sell iPads, iPhones to enterprises
iOS/2 gear loaded with apps for big biz ... uh oh BlackBerry
prev story

Whitepapers

Seven Steps to Software Security
Seven practical steps you can begin to take today to secure your applications and prevent the damages a successful cyber-attack can cause.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.