Feeds

Shell expected to slash 3,200 IT jobs

Oil firm 'loath' to confirm number

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

Oil giant Royal Dutch Shell has told its staff that it plans to make more than 3,000 job cuts.

According to a leaked memo to its staff from Shell's vice president of IT infrastructure Goh Swee Chen, the firm has been in talks with outsourcing outfits EDS, AT&T and T-systems, and said that contracts were expected to be inked in March.

She told Shell employees: "I acknowledge that there will still be uncertainty as we are working through the finalisation of contracts, open resourcing and transition preparations. I encourage you to keep an open mind and take the time to learn more about the suppliers as employers and as business partners."

The Register broke the story that Shell planned to offshore thousands of jobs in 2004.

We reported that almost 3,000 jobs in the firm's IT department could go abroad as part of Shell's cost-saving project, dubbed ITVision.

A Shell spokeswoman told us today that she was unable to comment on whether the cuts cited today were in addition to 2004's job cull.

She said that the Anglo-Dutch firm, as part of its $850m per annum like-for-like cost savings Infrastructure Sourcing Program (ISP) that first kicked off a few years ago, was continuing to look at ways of tightening the belt.

Shell had intended to reduce its headcount by 3,000 by the end of 2006. This suggests that the memo, which was published on anti-Shell website Royaldutchshellplc.com, in fact points to a new round of job cuts.

When pushed on whether or not Shell could provide a definitive figure on how many of its workers could be affected by the cuts, the spokeswoman said: "I can't confirm the number and I'm loath to comment on any number."

Royaldutchshellplc.com reckoned that around 3,200 jobs looked set to be outsourced, and that staff can expect to find out their fate in letters from the firm at some point this month. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
WHY did Sunday Mirror stoop to slurping selfies for smut sting?
Tabloid splashes, MP resigns - but there's a BIG copyright issue here
Spies, avert eyes! Tim Berners-Lee demands a UK digital bill of rights
Lobbies tetchy MPs 'to end indiscriminate online surveillance'
Scrapping the Human Rights Act: What about privacy and freedom of expression?
Justice minister's attack to destroy ability to challenge state
Inequality increasing? BOLLOCKS! You heard me: 'Screw the 1%'
There's morality and then there's economics ...
Google hits back at 'Dear Rupert' over search dominance claims
Choc Factory sniffs: 'We're not pirate-lovers - also, you publish The Sun'
EU to accuse Ireland of giving Apple an overly peachy tax deal – report
Probe expected to say single-digit rate was unlawful
While you queued for an iPhone 6, Apple's Cook sold shares worth $35m
Right before the stock took a 3.8% dive amid bent and broken mobe drama
prev story

Whitepapers

A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Beginner's guide to SSL certificates
De-mystify the technology involved and give you the information you need to make the best decision when considering your online security options.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.